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A female soldier in the government army in the Democratic Republic of the Congo: New staffing, improved training and other reforms are needed so that Africa’s security forces can better protect women.

Female freedom fighter from the Congo, similar to the kidnappers/terrorists aboard "The Majesty - Into The Fog"

Rocky Mountain Log Desk & Chair

This would be fairly easy to make to replace all of our antique ranch oak desks in our two bedroom cabins.

The traditional dress of Angola is the symbol of the ethnic culture of Angola as they have continued to follow their own cultural traits, traditions and languages. Mainly influenced with the cultural influences of typical Africa, the traditional dress of Angola is also having varying designs and patterns and made with various textiles.

Traditional dress of Angola: A symbol of the ethnic culture

Angolan women with traditional costume singing a song - Image by

'We Have to Break the Culture': Meet the Women Fighting Congo's Rape Epidemic

'We Have to Break the Culture': Meet the Women Fighting Congo's Rape Epidemic

Vice News, The Culture, Congo, Real Women, Feminism, We Have

Ruined by Lynn Nottage

At Manhattan Theater Club, a Play by Lynn Nottage About a Congolese Brothel and Civil War

Ruined by Lynn Nottage

Prostitution is another primary job for women. This picture makes me think about the stress and the hardships of poverty and the cause and effect relationship of poverty and being a women. Jobs like prostitution are almost forced onto women because of the difficulty to raise up in vertical job segregation. Women have to work so much harder to get higher up on the work ladder, and our ceiling is most men's floor, cause women to get lower jobs such as prostitution.

18 fascinating things I learnt living next door to a prostitute

Here are 18 fascinating things I learned living next door to a prostitute - despite stereotypes of red lights and fishnet stockings, those who use sex as an income can be as everyday as you or I.

A Widow’s Shelter: In parts of Burundi there is a custom: the only thing a woman takes with her to her new home when she marries, is her umbrella. And that umbrella may be all that she is left with in the end, thanks to another Burundi custom: a woman can be dispossessed of her home and farm when her husband dies. (Burundi, 2006) Photograph by Deborah Espinosa, senior attorney & land rights specialist at Landesa. Check out Landesa.org!

A Widow’s Shelter: In parts of Burundi there is a custom: the only thing a woman takes with her to her new home when she marries, is her umbrella. Photograph by Deborah Espinosa

In Congo, No Words to Describe the Atrocities | Women, War and Peace | PBS

In Congo, No Words to Describe the Atrocities

In Congo, No Words to Describe the Atrocities - Women, War and Peace

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