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Shop-Made Router Lift Features you can’t buy at a price you won’t believe. By Bruce Kieffer and Richard Tendick Router lifts are hot items these days and for good reason. Veteran router table users love their ability to make super-fine micro adjustments or rapidly raise the bit right from the tabletop. No more fumbling under the table like a contortionist. The only drawback is the price: $200 to $500. Ouch! …

AW Extra 8/9/12 - Shop-Made Router Lift

Shop-Made Router Lift Features you can’t buy at a price you won’t believe. By Bruce Kieffer and Richard Tendick Router lifts are hot items these days and for good reason. Veteran router table users love their ability to make super-fine micro adjustments or rapidly raise the bit right from the tabletop. No more fumbling under the table like a contortionist. The only drawback is the price: $200 to $500. Ouch! …

Human Power:  The lathe is made from 1 3/4" Poplar with a hard maple tool rest and Bubinga handles.

Human Power: The lathe is made from 1 3/4" Poplar with a hard maple tool rest and Bubinga handles.

Crescent as Caliper by popularmechanics, 1965: Use an adjustable wrench to determine a bolt's diameter and match the jaw's reading with a corresponding drill bit diameter. #Hack #popularmechanics

Know Your Stuff: The 110 Best DIY Tips Ever

Crescent as Caliper by popularmechanics, 1965: Use an adjustable wrench to determine a bolt's diameter and match the jaw's reading with a corresponding drill bit diameter. #Hack #popularmechanics

Woodworker: Greg Scala  Scala knew that he needed a workbench that was dead-flat, sturdy, equipped with good vises, and built at the right height for his 5-ft.-9-in. frame. He also wanted a board jack, a Veritas twin-screw end vise, lots of benchdogs, and a vintage feel. He modeled his maple and walnut bench (34-in. wide by 82-in. long by 32-1/2-in. tall) after Lon Schleining’s "Essential Workbench" in FWW #167  I want someting like this

Woodworker: Greg Scala Scala knew that he needed a workbench that was dead-flat, sturdy, equipped with good vises, and built at the right height for his 5-ft.-9-in. frame. He also wanted a board jack, a Veritas twin-screw end vise, lots of benchdogs, and a vintage feel. He modeled his maple and walnut bench (34-in. wide by 82-in. long by 32-1/2-in. tall) after Lon Schleining’s "Essential Workbench" in FWW #167 I want someting like this

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