Explore The Governor, Spanish Colonial and more!

Explore related topics

Spanish chest. Courtesy Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA), 065701.

Courtesy Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA),

nm-hisory-mu-seum

TripAdvisor’s Top 10 Things To Do In Santa Fe

Diego de los Ríos, the last Spanish Governor-General of the Philippines. He became the governor on Aug. 13, 1898, with the capital at Iloilo on Panay Island, after Governor-General Fermin Jaudenes surrendered at Manila. His term ended on Dec. 10, 1898 when the Treaty of Paris was signed.People and Places: War of independence Against America, 1899-1902

He first visited Manila, where he met the Governor General Emilio Terrero,(seated) and they had a dialogue regarding Rizal’s novel, Rizal promised to give him a copy. It is unfortunate that this Governor General will fail Rizal in his hour of need

The Segesser Hides bear the first known depictions of Spanish colonial life in the United States. The hides illustrate an ambush in present-day Nebraska of a 1720 expedition led by the then-Lt. Governor of New Mexico. Painted on animal hide, likely bison, they are believed to have been created in New Mexico. Photo by Blair Clark, New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs.

Department of Cultural Affairs Media Center :: Media Bank :: Segesser Hide Paintings :: Segesser Hide detail

He was born in Seville, his father was a sailer who traveled with Christopher Columbus. in 1507 he was ordained as a priest, he then went to Cuba and witnessed brutal massacre of indigenous Americans, he then gave up his property and fought again the Spaniards cruelty. He tried to set up a colony but failed. The europeans argued that the Indians were "natural slaves." As for the black legend it was a slam or Spaniards

Bartolomé de Las Casas - Discuss de Las Casas' early life and how he tried to provide justice for Indians. What were some of the European arguments he came up against in his struggle about enslavement of natives? What was the "black legend?

Charles de Hault de Lassus was Spanish colonial lieutenant governor in St. Louis when Napoleon Bonaparte sold the Louisiana territory to the United States in 1803. France had lost the vast land four decades earlier but won it back in a secret treaty with Spain a few years before the Louisiana Purchase. De Lassus was a Frenchman by birth, but colonial rulers filled jobs as best they could in the American wilderness. (Missouri History Museum)

American soldiers claimed all of Upper Louisiana for the United States in a two-day ceremony in the village of St. Louis in March

Spanish Governor’s Palace (San Antonio) This National Historic Landmark represents the last visual remnants of the Presidio San Antonio de Béjar and the only example still standing of a Spanish Colonial townhouse. Come tour this amazing piece of history any time of the week from Tuesday through Sunday.

You'll Want To Visit These 15 Houses In Texas For Their Incredible Pasts

Spanish Governor’s Palace (San Antonio) This National Historic Landmark represents the last visual remnants of the Presidio San Antonio de Béjar and the only example still standing of a Spanish Colonial townhouse. Come tour this amazing piece of history any time of the week from Tuesday through Sunday.

At 6 p.m., see history come to life when 18th century Spanish soldiers march down St. Augustine's St. George Street from the Colonial Quarter to the Governor's House Cultural Center & Museum where they perform authentic military drills before firing an exciting volley of musketry. The event features the St. Augustine Garrison.

At 6 p.m., see history come to life when 18th century Spanish soldiers march down St. Augustine's St. George Street from the Colonial Quarter to the Governor's House Cultural Center & Museum where they perform authentic military drills before firing an exciting volley of musketry. The event features the St. Augustine Garrison.

Palace of the Governors  105 W. Palace Ave., Santa Fe, NM 87501  To firmly ground yourself in New Mexico's rich past, visit this museum on the Santa Fe Plaza. Built by the Spanish as a government building in 1610, the Palace remains the country's oldest continuously occupied public building. Its exhibits chronicle the history of Santa Fe as well as New Mexico and the region. American Indian artists sell their wares under its historic portal as part of the Native American Vendors Program.

Palace of the Governors 105 W. Palace Ave., Santa Fe, NM 87501 To firmly ground yourself in New Mexico's rich past, visit this museum on the Santa Fe Plaza. Built by the Spanish as a government building in 1610, the Palace remains the country's oldest continuously occupied public building. Its exhibits chronicle the history of Santa Fe as well as New Mexico and the region. American Indian artists sell their wares under its historic portal as part of the Native American Vendors Program.

Pinterest
Search