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This is a raw image, taken Jan. 13, 2015, showing the dwarf planet Ceres as seen from the Dawn spacecraft on its approach. Dawn's framing camera took this image at 238,000 miles (383,000 kilometers) from Ceres.

This is a raw image, taken Jan. 13, 2015, showing the dwarf planet Ceres as seen from the Dawn spacecraft on its approach. Dawn's framing camera took this image at 238,000 miles (383,000 kilometers) from Ceres.

A zoomed-in view of the dwarf planet Ceres, seen from a distance of 238,000 miles (383,000 kilometers) by the Dawn spacecraft on Jan. 13, 2015. The image hints at the presence of craters and other features on Ceres' surface. <br />

A zoomed-in view of the dwarf planet Ceres, seen from a distance of 238,000 miles (383,000 kilometers) by the Dawn spacecraft on Jan. 13, 2015. The image hints at the presence of craters and other features on Ceres' surface. <br />

NASA's New Horizons probe has captured new photos — which show Pluto and its largest moon, Charon — with its telescopic camera on Jan. 25 and Jan. 27, when the probe was about 126 million miles (203 million kilometers) from the Pluto system.

NASA's New Horizons probe has captured new photos — which show Pluto and its largest moon, Charon — with its telescopic camera on Jan. 25 and Jan. 27, when the probe was about 126 million miles (203 million kilometers) from the Pluto system.

Charon, as seen from Pluto, simulated in the Starry Night software.<br />

Charon, as seen from Pluto, simulated in the Starry Night software.<br />

The high-speed impact of a wayward space rock on the surface of the moon last year triggered the brightest lunar explosion ever seen, scientists say. Video footage of the record-breaking meteorite strike on the moon, which occurred on Sept. 11, 2013, shows a long flash that was almost as bright as the North Star Polaris. That means the boulder-sized meteorite's lunar crash could have been visible to anyone on Earth who happened to be staring up at the moon at 8:07 p.m. GMT, weather…

The high-speed impact of a wayward space rock on the surface of the moon last year triggered the brightest lunar explosion ever seen, scientists say. Video footage of the record-breaking meteorite strike on the moon, which occurred on Sept. 11, 2013, shows a long flash that was almost as bright as the North Star Polaris. That means the boulder-sized meteorite's lunar crash could have been visible to anyone on Earth who happened to be staring up at the moon at 8:07 p.m. GMT, weather…

Venus Express Survives Close Encounter With Hellish Atmosphere - It was a daring maneuver, but the plan to put Venus Express lower in the planet’s thick atmosphere has worked. For the past month, the European Space Agency steered the long-running spacecraft to altitudes as low as 81 miles (131 kilometers) for a couple of minutes at a time.

Venus Express Survives Close Encounter With Hellish Atmosphere - It was a daring maneuver, but the plan to put Venus Express lower in the planet’s thick atmosphere has worked. For the past month, the European Space Agency steered the long-running spacecraft to altitudes as low as 81 miles (131 kilometers) for a couple of minutes at a time.

Cassini VIMS image showing specular reflections in one of Titan%u2019s many lakes during the T85 flyby on July 24, 2012.

Cassini VIMS image showing specular reflections in one of Titan%u2019s many lakes during the T85 flyby on July 24, 2012.

India's first Mars orbiter Mangalyaan captured this photo of the Martian atmosphere just after arriving at Mars on Sept. 24, 2014 Indian Standard Time. The Indian Space Research Organisation released the image on Sept. 25. - Credit: Indian Space Research Organisation

India's first Mars orbiter Mangalyaan captured this photo of the Martian atmosphere just after arriving at Mars on Sept. 24, 2014 Indian Standard Time. The Indian Space Research Organisation released the image on Sept. 25. - Credit: Indian Space Research Organisation

This image, captured Feb. 1, 2014, shows a colorized view of Earth from the moon-based perspective of NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.

This image, captured Feb. 1, 2014, shows a colorized view of Earth from the moon-based perspective of NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.

This image shows a composite view of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 1399. The stellar component, as observed at optical wavelengths, is shown in white at the center of the image. The galaxy is embedded in a hot atmosphere of ionized hydrogen gas, which is shown in blue. With temperatures up to tens of millions of K, the hot gas shines brightly in X-rays and was observed using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory.

This image shows a composite view of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 1399. The stellar component, as observed at optical wavelengths, is shown in white at the center of the image. The galaxy is embedded in a hot atmosphere of ionized hydrogen gas, which is shown in blue. With temperatures up to tens of millions of K, the hot gas shines brightly in X-rays and was observed using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory.

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