Explore Hattiesburg Mississippi, Freedom Riders, and more!

Freedom Summer

Voter registration volunteer Jacob Blum (Roslyn Heights, New York; a student at Yale University) looks back at the camera after hanging on the front of Mt. Zion Baptist Church a sign which reads "Help Make Mississippi Part of the USA / Register to Vote".

CORE worker accompanying a woman to the courthouse, where she will try to register to vote. | In 1964, 45% of Mississippi's population was Black, but less than 5% of Blacks were registered to vote state-wide. Registering voters in Batesville, Mississippi during Freedom Summer, 1964. (photo by Robert Brand)

CORE worker accompanying a woman to the courthouse, where she will try to register to vote.

An Astonishing Catalog of the Violence Committed Against “Freedom Summer” Participants in a Single Mississippi Town: This “Incident Summary” details acts of harassment, big and small, reported by civil rights activists and allies working in McComb, Miss. in the summer of 1964. Page 2 of 2.

An Astonishing Catalog of the Violence Committed Against “Freedom Summer” Participants in a Single Mississippi Town

This “Incident Summary” details acts of harassment, big and small, reported by civil rights activists and allies working in McComb, Miss.

[© Herbert Randall] Reading in the library at the Freedom House in Hattiesburg, Mississippi during Freedom Summer 1964. possibly photo #246 http://www.lib.usm.edu/legacy/archives/m351ph1a.htm

Reading in the library at the Freedom House in Hattiesburg, Mississippi during Freedom Summer 1964 (copyright Herbert Randall)

Freedom Summer: How Civil Rights Activists Braved Violence to Challenge Racism in 1964 Mississippi

You Have No Excuse for Not Voting. We get the government we deserve, and we are on track for one that is heedless of concern for women's health, and poised to eliminate unions and more regard for corporations than you.

Freedom Rider Bob Moses

The Greenwood Movement

Summer of 1964 - An elderly female volunteer for the Freedom Summer Movement works with children. The Freedom Summer, also known as the Mississippi Summer Project, was a movement to register as many new African American voters as possible in Mississippi during the summer of 1964.

Summer of 1964 - An elderly female volunteer for the Freedom Summer Movement works with children. The Freedom Summer, also known as the Mississippi Summer Project, was a movement to register as many new African American voters as possible in Mississippi during the summer of 1964.

The Lessons of Freedom Summer | Reimagine!

A protestor being grabbed by police in Greenwood, Mississippi, in summer, on Freedom Day.

Civil Rights Volunteers in Mississippi (Summer 1964)

Civil Rights Volunteers in Mississippi :: Freedom Summer Digital Collection

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