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Uriah Heep, Live (3.83): If there's any one argument for including Uriah Heep on this list of the 101 best metal albums of the 70s, then this is it. The band travels through their catalog in sublime fashion, bringing the heavy at each step, and it comes off quite well. Except for the ending medley, which I just find to be boring and unnecessary. I've said it before, but if you close a show with something other than your own stuff... then maybe you don't belong on stage to begin with. 9/26/16

Live: Uriah Heep: UK reissue of 1973 album, packaged in a miniature LP sleeve. 13 tracks over two discs including 'Sweet Lorraine', 'Tears In My Eyes' & 'July Morning'.

Quartz, Quartz (3.78): I read somewhere that this just might be the very first NWOBHM album which is possible; and if so, it got the era off to a rousing start. Personally, I think Motorhead's first effort might take that honor, but it really matters not either way. Ultimately, this does set a standard for many of the other NWOBHM bands to follow and it well worth being in my top 101 of 70s metal. 9/22/16

Quartz, Quartz (3.78): I read somewhere that this just might be the very first NWOBHM album which is possible; and if so, it got the era off to a rousing start. Personally, I think Motorhead's first effort might take that honor, but it really matters not either way. Ultimately, this does set a standard for many of the other NWOBHM bands to follow and it well worth being in my top 101 of 70s metal. 9/22/16

Manilla Road, Invasion (4.17): On this, their debut album, Manilla Road brings together their hard rock, prog rock, and even 60s psychedelic influences to bear into a heavy metal stew that is at one forward looking while firmly rooted in the past. In other words, it manages to sound current and nostalgic all at the same time, allowing it to transcend beyond its own time. Cool album. 9/16/16

Manilla Road, Invasion (4.17): On this, their debut album, Manilla Road brings together their hard rock, prog rock, and even 60s psychedelic influences to bear into a heavy metal stew that is at one forward looking while firmly rooted in the past. In other words, it manages to sound current and nostalgic all at the same time, allowing it to transcend beyond its own time. Cool album. 9/16/16

Lucifer's Friend, Lucifer's Friend (4.00): Though the band fell off the heavy bandwagon after this album (and the quality one as well), this album belongs in the conversation as to what was the first set of heavy metal albums. And it's a good one to boot. "Ride in the Sky" is a near perfect mission statement for the band, and the title track is pure molten gold. I like this album a lot. 9/28/16

Find a Lucifer's Friend - Lucifer's Friend first pressing or reissue. Complete your Lucifer's Friend collection. Shop Vinyl and CDs.

Rush, Permanent Waves (4.67): I know that some people reading this will tell me I'm wrong by including this in a "best of heavy metal" list, but Rush was pretty heavy for the era, and they certainly bring the intellectual that permeates metal. Besides, it's my list, and I do what I want on it. That being said, I think this is close enough to metal for inclusion here, and it's also quite outstanding so it belongs on any best of list I can get it on. 9/16/16

Rush Permanent Waves on Numbered Limited-Edition Gold CD from Mobile Fidelity Numbered Limited Edition Mini-LP Style

Black Sabbath, We Sold Our Souls for Rock N Roll (3.77): This is simply a master class in the art of heavy metal. The set contains 17 of the most important tracks in the development of the genre and pretty much set the template for all the metal music yet to be birthed in the world. One of the most important sets of music in all of rock history. 9/24/16

Black Sabbath, We Sold Our Souls for Rock N Roll (3.77): This is simply a master class in the art of heavy metal. The set contains 17 of the most important tracks in the development of the genre and pretty much set the template for all the metal music yet to be birthed in the world. One of the most important sets of music in all of rock history. 9/24/16

Uriah Heep, Return to Fantasy (3.78): Now, that's the Uriah Heep I remember listening to and really liking.  Up to this point on this 101 list, I'd listened to rather unheavy albums from the band, making me question my own perception when I elected to place them in this genre. Well, with this one album, they've justified their presence here. Kudos. 9/24/16

Uriah Heep, Return to Fantasy (3.78): Now, that's the Uriah Heep I remember listening to and really liking. Up to this point on this 101 list, I'd listened to rather unheavy albums from the band, making me question my own perception when I elected to place them in this genre. Well, with this one album, they've justified their presence here. Kudos. 9/24/16

Judas Priest, British Steel (4.00): As I've stated on several occasions, I've often thought that Judas Priest was a bit overrated, and this may be their most overrated effort ever. That's not to say that it's not a good album and a fine example of 70s metal. But I just can't hear what the big deal is about this album at times. That being said, it still makes it into my top 20 of 70s metal, mostly on the strength of "Breaking the Law" "Living After Midnight," and "Metal Gods." 9/16/16

A list of all the groups that have released album covers that look like the Judas Priest British Steel album.

Chevy, The Taker (4.44): This is a fantastic bit of lost NWOBHM that just blows me away every time I have the pleasure of listening to it. Admittedly, that's been a grand total of about three times, but that's three times in the past two and a half years. And I'd never heard of them before that. I'm so glad that the Internet has allowed me the opportunity that record stores and radio stations couldn't back then. It allows me to find great albums like this one. 9/16/16

Chevy, The Taker (4.44): This is a fantastic bit of lost NWOBHM that just blows me away every time I have the pleasure of listening to it. Admittedly, that's been a grand total of about three times, but that's three times in the past two and a half years. And I'd never heard of them before that. I'm so glad that the Internet has allowed me the opportunity that record stores and radio stations couldn't back then. It allows me to find great albums like this one. 9/16/16

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