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learning head wrap history - "black mummy " the mammy image served the political, social, and economic interests of mainstream white America. During slavery, the mammy caricature was posited as proof that blacks -- in this case, black women -- were contented, even happy, as slaves. Her wide grin, hearty laugher, and loyal servitude were offered as evidence of the supposed humanity of the institution of slavery.

learning head wrap history - "black mummy " the mammy image served the political, social, and economic interests of mainstream white America. During slavery, the mammy caricature was posited as proof that blacks -- in this case, black women -- were contented, even happy, as slaves. Her wide grin, hearty laugher, and loyal servitude were offered as evidence of the supposed humanity of the institution of slavery.

"All you need is a wish and a few pennies!" - Aunt Jemima's Magic Ready-Mix ad - Good Housekeeping 3/1/1940

"All you need is a wish and a few pennies!" - Aunt Jemima's Magic Ready-Mix ad - Good Housekeeping 3/1/1940

Nigger Head Oysters Can

Nigger Head Oysters Can

Educator and suffrage activist Nannie Helen Burroughs 1909. In 1896, she helped form the National Association of Colored Women (NACW).

Educator and suffrage activist Nannie Helen Burroughs 1909. In 1896, she helped form the National Association of Colored Women (NACW).

The Legend: "Time travel will be invented in the year 2025. How do we know? Because that is the year that this delightful lady claimed to have traveled from. In the year 1898, according the contemporary reports, Alexandria Alexis appeared 'as if from nowhere' and took New York society by storm. Some fawned over her while others claimed she was insane. This debate was however rendered moot when, on New Year's Eve 1899, she simply disappeared..."

The Legend: "Time travel will be invented in the year 2025. How do we know? Because that is the year that this delightful lady claimed to have traveled from. In the year 1898, according the contemporary reports, Alexandria Alexis appeared 'as if from nowhere' and took New York society by storm. Some fawned over her while others claimed she was insane. This debate was however rendered moot when, on New Year's Eve 1899, she simply disappeared..."

Actress Aunjanue Ellis in "The Book of Negroes," produced by CBC TV (Canada), airing on BET. Ellis portrays [fictional] protagonist Aminata Diallo, captured [in West Africa] in her teens and spent most of her life [enslaved, not "slave"] in [South Carolina - colonial, slave-holding British North America, which became the USA]. Having spent most of her life in captivity, she longs to return to her homeland of Mali[?? Film says "Guinea"], which becomes pivotal part of her character's story."

Actress Aunjanue Ellis in "The Book of Negroes," produced by CBC TV (Canada), airing on BET. Ellis portrays [fictional] protagonist Aminata Diallo, captured [in West Africa] in her teens and spent most of her life [enslaved, not "slave"] in [South Carolina - colonial, slave-holding British North America, which became the USA]. Having spent most of her life in captivity, she longs to return to her homeland of Mali[?? Film says "Guinea"], which becomes pivotal part of her character's story."

Coronel Carmen Amelia Robles Ávila (peleó junto a Emiliano Zapata durante la Revolución Mexicana). Mujeres combatientes, mujeres militantes.

Coronel Carmen Amelia Robles Ávila (peleó junto a Emiliano Zapata durante la Revolución Mexicana). Mujeres combatientes, mujeres militantes.

Dianne Caroll, Hattie McDaniel, Lena Horne, Ruby Dee, Ethel Waters, Dorthy Dandridge, Pam Grier, Eartha Kitt, Cicely Tyson.

Dianne Caroll, Hattie McDaniel, Lena Horne, Ruby Dee, Ethel Waters, Dorthy Dandridge, Pam Grier, Eartha Kitt, Cicely Tyson.

I found this video of clips of various cartoons that used black stereotypes and I thought it was very interest that these were just common cartoons back in the day. I didn't realize that Bugs Bunny did black face so often. http://kathmanduk2.wordpress.com/2008/06/24/marlon-riggss-ethnic-notions-transcript/#

MARLON RIGGS’S ‘ETHNIC NOTIONS’: TRANSCRIPT

I found this video of clips of various cartoons that used black stereotypes and I thought it was very interest that these were just common cartoons back in the day. I didn't realize that Bugs Bunny did black face so often. http://kathmanduk2.wordpress.com/2008/06/24/marlon-riggss-ethnic-notions-transcript/#

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