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This German tank (which was the only tank fielded by Germany during the First World War) was captured at the battle of Villers-Bretonneux in Pictured here with British soldiers.

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There are just so many good infographics and interactives out there that I’ve begun a new semi-regular feature called “Infographics & Interactives Galore.” You can see others at A Collection Of…

Soldiers sacrifice their mental health at war. Seeing all of the gruesome gore, witnessing mass deaths and being involved in stressful situations often leaves a soldier with post-traumatic stress disorder. When a soldier returns home they often cannot go back to their lives like everything is perfectly fine. They have to alter their life because of the war. War can cause men to suffer.

A shell shocked soldier in the trenches during World War One. Cover image of the book "Broken Men: Shell Shock, Treatment and Recovery in Britain, written by Fiona Reid.

A lone British soldier stands up to his knees in spent shell cases. France, WWI.

A lone British soldier stands up to his knees in spent shell cases - France, WWI. During the artillery bombardment of the Somme, 1600 guns fired over million shells.

In honor of the centennial of World War I, we're remembering the momentous period of history that forever changed the world as we know it. July 1914 was the month that changed the world. On 28 June 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated, and just five weeks later the Great Powers of Europe were at war. But how did it all happen?

The month that changed the world: a timeline to war

In honor of the centennial of World War I, we're remembering the momentous period of history that forever changed the world as we know it. July 1914 was the month that changed the world. On 28 June 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated, and just five weeks later the Great Powers of Europe were at war. But how did it all happen?

The month that changed the world: a timeline to war

The month that changed the world: a timeline to war

July 1914 was the month that changed the world. On 28 June Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated, and just five weeks later the Great Powers of Europe were at war. But how did it all happen?

This is a statue by Andy Edwards entitled “All Together Now” which for the next few days will be on display in St Luke’s, Liverpool’s famous “bombed out church”. The figures are about to shake hands standing over a football which relates to the time that British and German soldiers paused, apparently to play football on Christmas Day 1914. The hands do not quite meet which allows one to place a hand between them, joining the act of all too brief sanity on that day. The figures will leave…

This is a statue by Andy Edwards entitled “All Together Now” which for the next few days will be on display in St Luke’s, Liverpool’s famous “bombed out church”. The figures are about to shake hands standing over a football which relates to the time that British and German soldiers paused, apparently to play football on Christmas Day 1914. The hands do not quite meet which allows one to place a hand between them, joining the act of all too brief sanity on that day. The figures will leave…

Robert Graves, c. 1914, age 19. Reported dead at the Somme, Graves in fact lived to the age of 90

Robert Graves, age Although reported dead at the Somme, Graves was one of the few of his generation to survive World War I. He became a translator, poet and novelist, and was the author of "I Claudius." Graves died at the age of 90 in

The severe effects of shellshock, what we now know as PTSD, on a WWI soldier

20 Scary Real Photos

Pictured below is a shell-shocked soldier in a trench in during the Battle of Courcelette. Shell shock is the trauma of continuous bombardment that causes panic, inability to reason, sleep, walk or talk. Often, they lose their self control entirely.

WWI Munitions Factories in the UK - here, Woolwich Arsenel. Conditions were poor, and the work was arduous. Some women worked 13 days of 12 hour shifts without a break. Although figures were suppressed to keep morale high, accidents were common. An explosion at a TNT plant in 1917 in East London killed 73 people and destroyed hundreds of homes. Dangerous chemicals caused health problems that lasted long after the war. More at link!

What did World War One really do for women?

Work/Work balance When productivity was all that mattered, there was no work/life balance on offer. In order to keep pace with demand from t.

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