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Modern replica of the Antikythera Mechanism, a Hellenistic astronomical computer, on display in room 38 of the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.

Modern replica of the Antikythera Mechanism, a Hellenistic astronomical computer, on display in room 38 of the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.

This rotating globe illuminates to show how the world's cities look at night from space. True to the view from orbit, the globe glistens with a soft white glow in major metropolitan areas throughout Eastern Europe and North America and has sparsely lit areas scattered throughout Africa and Russia.

"This rotating globe illuminates to show how the world's cities look at night from space. True to the view from orbit, the globe glistens with a soft white glow in major metropolitan areas.

didactic armillary sphere made by Professor H. Albrecht Berlin late 19th century

View this item and discover similar globes for sale at - Very rare astronomical instrument, iron and paper, for didactic use: it’s an armillary sphere and sundial together, signed “Verlag von Ernst Schotte

A Brass Timepiece-Driven Orrery --  Eric Watson, Oldham, circa 1985 | from the central sun the Earth rotates on its axis and the moon rotates around the Earth, the five visible planets, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn rotate in real time around the sun, the tripod base mounted on a sapele veneered hexagonal plinth, the moulded frieze with a brass drawer containing winder and manual crank, with a glazed cover | Sotheby's

A brass timepiece-driven orrery, Eric Watson, Oldham, circa 1985

Minoan object preceded the heralded Antikythera Mechanism by 1,400 years, and was the first analog and portable computer in history. A stone-made matrix has carved symbols on its surface are related with the Sun and the Moon serving as a cast to build a mechanism that functioned as an analog computer to calculate solar and lunar eclipses. The mechanism was also used as sundial and as an instrument calculating the geographical latitude.

Researcher Tsikritsis maintains that the Minoan Age object uncovered in 1898 in Paleokastro site in the Sitia district of western Crete, preceded the heralded Antikythera Mechanism by years, and was the first analog and portable computer in history.

It is an ancient tool, created over two thousand years ago when people thought that the Earth was the center of the universe. They are often referred to as the first computer and however debatable that statement might be there is one thing for sure without a doubt.  Astrolabes are objects of immense mystery and beauty.

Astrolabe - Astrolabes are problem solving instruments – they compute things such as the time of day according the position of the sun and the stars in the sky. Like a computer, you input information and then you receive output. They were ty

A Muslim & a Christian scientist meet in 14th Century Spain to discuss astrolabes, & how best to map the stars of their Gods

Astrolabe old MiddleAge pagan tech computer mystery/beauty for sky map/astronomy/time/day calc with earth as ctr of univ, typically brass) at NY MET (photo 2003 by Charles Tilford or ListenToReason

antique planetarium model - Google zoeken

(Imagine if they had to deal with dwarf planets. "Oh fuck, Pluto's orbit is TILTED")

The astrolabe was invented in the Hellenistic world in 150 BC and the invention is usually credited to Hipparchus. It had many different uses include locating and predicting the positions of the Sun, Moon, planets, and stars, determining local time given local latitude and vice-versa. Before tools like the chronometer, it was used to aid navigation for sailors.

The astrolabe was invented in the Hellenistic world in 150 BC and the invention…

Enigma of ancient computer solved.  A replica of the Antikythera Mechanism, a stunningly complex 2,100-year-old celestial computer.   Credit: The Antikythera Mechanism Research Project

Ancient artifacts resembling the Antikythera mechanism, an ancient bronze clockwork astronomical calculator, may rest amid the larger-than-expected Roman shipwreck that yielded the device in

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