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Modern replica of the Antikythera Mechanism, a Hellenistic astronomical computer, on display in room 38 of the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.

Modern replica of the Antikythera Mechanism, a Hellenistic astronomical computer, on display in room 38 of the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.

circles.

Orrery is a mechanical model of the solar system, or of just the sun, earth, and moon, used to represent their relative positions and motions.

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The Antikythera mechanism is an ancient analog computer designed to predict astronomical positions and eclipses for calendrical and astrological purposes, as well as the Olympiads, the cycles of the ancient Olympic Games.

Samuel Morland's Adding Machine, invented in 1666

The arithmetical machines of Morland were devised between 1662 and 1666 and were presented to the King Charles II and general audience. First machine is a simple adding device.

Astronomical compendium  This astronomical compendium, in the shape of a Missal, carries the coat of arms of the Company of Jesus (IHS). The outer face of the lid bears a lunar dial showing the phases of the moon; the inner face is engraved with the hour lines. Inside, there is a tilting gnomon mounted on a compass (now missing), that ensured the instrument's correct orientation and allowed its use as a dial. The back of the book displays the planetary hours.

Astronomical compendium This astronomical compendium, in the shape of a Missal…

It is an ancient tool, created over two thousand years ago when people thought that the Earth was the center of the universe. They are often referred to as the first computer and however debatable that statement might be there is one thing for sure without a doubt.  Astrolabes are objects of immense mystery and beauty.

Astrolabe - Astrolabes are problem solving instruments – they compute things such as the time of day according the position of the sun and the stars in the sky. Like a computer, you input information and then you receive output. They were ty

Polyhedral sundial with 26 faces, dating from the 16th century. On display at the Museum of the History of Sciences in Florence, Italy. Artist: Tomsich. [Click for Hi-Rez] (via http://fineartamerica.com/featured/polyhedral-sundial-tomsich.html )

Polyhedral sundial with 26 faces, dating from the C, Museum of the History of Sciences, Florence, Italy Artist: Tomsich

Epact: Scientific Instruments of Medieval and Renaissance Europe

Epact: Astronomical Compendium signed by Christoph Schissler, later century

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