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Mapping Texas: The Gulf Coast — Coastal Counties, Part 1 – Save Texas History – Medium

Mapping Texas: The Gulf Coast — Coastal Counties, Part 1 – Save Texas History – Medium

This comprehensive map of Travis County was compiled and drawn by Herman Pressler, the son of notable nineteenth century Texas mapmaker and…

Map of Travis Co., 1894 By Herman Pressler

This comprehensive map of Travis County was compiled and drawn by Herman Pressler, the son of notable nineteenth century Texas mapmaker and…

Maps of the Republic of Texas

Maps of the Republic of Texas

County and Railroad Map of Texas, 1876 — Medium

County and Railroad Map of Texas, 1876

County and Railroad Map of Texas, 1876 — Medium

Map of Texas, California and Oregon 1846 #map #usa

Map of Texas, California and Oregon 1846 #map #usa

Here's an 1841 map of Texas that shows the former boundaries stretching way into what is now Colorado and New Mexico, "the way God and Sam Houston intended," to quote a friend of mine. In west Texas is noted "droves of wild cattle and horses" and also shows where you will find Comanche, Caddo, Creek, Shawnee, Apache, Cherokee, "Lepan," and Kickapoos Indians. This map is held by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Here's an 1841 map of Texas that shows the former boundaries stretching way into what is now Colorado and New Mexico, "the way God and Sam Houston intended," to quote a friend of mine. In west Texas is noted "droves of wild cattle and horses" and also shows where you will find Comanche, Caddo, Creek, Shawnee, Apache, Cherokee, "Lepan," and Kickapoos Indians. This map is held by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Texas regimental flag carried through the bloody carnage at the Battle of Franklin and up to the final surrender of the Civil War.  The Star of Texas is barely visible in center.  Several Texans died carrying this flag.  It is said the blood of some of them can still be seen on the cloth. Rather than surrendering the flag, Mark Kelton of the 6th Texas took it from its staff and carried it back to Texas. He donated the flag to the State Archives in 1885, where it has been stored ever since.

Texas regimental flag carried through the bloody carnage at the Battle of Franklin and up to the final surrender of the Civil War. The Star of Texas is barely visible in center. Several Texans died carrying this flag. It is said the blood of some of them can still be seen on the cloth. Rather than surrendering the flag, Mark Kelton of the 6th Texas took it from its staff and carried it back to Texas. He donated the flag to the State Archives in 1885, where it has been stored ever since.

This broadside in the State Archives was published circa 1880 to promote emigration, enticing the working class and other prospective Texans with the “Most Healthy and Agreeable Climate, The Best Timber, The Richest Minerals, The Most Fertile Soil, The Largest Stock Region, And the Greatest Variety of Products to Be Found in the World. GO TO TEXAS!”

This broadside in the State Archives was published circa 1880 to promote emigration, enticing the working class and other prospective Texans with the “Most Healthy and Agreeable Climate, The Best Timber, The Richest Minerals, The Most Fertile Soil, The Largest Stock Region, And the Greatest Variety of Products to Be Found in the World. GO TO TEXAS!”

Today In History: After A 13 Day Battle, The Texas Alamo Is Seized By 3000 Mexican Troops (1836)

Today In History: After A 13 Day Battle, The Texas Alamo Is Seized By 3000 Mexican Troops (1836)

Padre Steve Remembers the Alamo

The Goliad Massacre, the darkest day in Texas history, took place here on Palm Sunday, March 27, 1836, when Col. James Fannin and 352 men under his command were executed under orders of the Mexican dictator General Santa Anna. There was twice as much loss of life here at Goliad than at the Alamo.  Nothing had touched the raw nerve of the American character as did the news of the large number of men who were slaughtered execution style after willfully surrendering.

The Goliad Massacre, the darkest day in Texas history, took place here on Palm Sunday, March 27, 1836, when Col. James Fannin and 352 men under his command were executed under orders of the Mexican dictator General Santa Anna. There was twice as much loss of life here at Goliad than at the Alamo. Nothing had touched the raw nerve of the American character as did the news of the large number of men who were slaughtered execution style after willfully surrendering.

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