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Princess Nagako (Empress Kojun), circa 1921. Japan.

"Kuni-no-miya Nagako [Princess Nagako Kuni], future Empress Kōjun when she was 9 years old in Kōbunsha, Empress Dowager Showa, (published in)

The women of the samurai had as main role to look after the house. This was especially crucial in the ' feudal times , when the husbands were often away fighting in other States or engaged in clan battles. His wife, or okugatasama (literally: the one who stays at home), as well as look after the children and chores, he was often having to physically defend the house from thieves and invaders. For this reason, many women of the samurai class were trained skillful use of a weapon in the…

In feudal times, the samurai's wife, or okugatasama (literally: the one who stays at home), looked after the children and chores, and defend the house from thieves and invaders while her husband was away in State or clan battles.

The "Ironing Board" without the Iron. Actually, it's better described as a "drying board", I suppose. The wet kimono was "stuck" to the board, and the water smoothed down by hand from top to bottom. The shape was carefully preserved, preventing any odd "stretching" in any one direction, and it was dried in place -- or at least until dry enough to be removed and carefully hung in another place that would hasten drying on both sides, and prevent str...

mortisia: “ KIMONO DAYS — Japanese Women and Their Everyday Tools. The “Ironing Board” without the Iron. Actually, it’s better described as a “drying board”, I suppose. The wet kimono was “stuck” to.

It hand-tinted albumen print was taken in the 1880s by a relatively obscure but active photographer named YAMAMOTO.

Quite a beautiful image of a Geisha (or older Maiko) posing for a "domestic scene". It's hand-tinted albumen print was taken in the by a relatively obscure but active photographer named YAMAMOTO.

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