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Margrete Skulesdatter (1208–1270) was a Norwegian Queen consort, spouse of King Haakon IV of Norway. Queen Margaret does not appear to have participated in politics, though she apparently protected her economical rights. She does seem to have accompanied her spouse on his travels around the country and to have played an active role as queen. She was engaged in a conflict with the bishop of Stavanger, which was solved by Cardinal William of Sabina.

- Haakon IV of Norway - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Esclaramunda of Foix (1255–1315) was queen of Majorca. She was married to James II of Majorca, and she was responsible for tutoring her grandson James III of Majorca. She was protector of the Order of Mercy. Her feast is on the 22nd October.

Esclaramunda of Foix was queen of Majorca. She was married to James II of Majorca, and she was responsible for tutoring her grandson James III of Majorca. She was protector of the Order of Mercy. Her feast is on the October.

Bertrade de Montfort (c. 1070 – 14 February 1117) was the daughter of Simon I de Montfort and Agnes, Countess of Evreux. Her brother was Amaury de Montfort. First married to Fulk IV, Count of Anjou in 1089 and the mother of his son Fulk of Jerusalem, when the lovely Bertrade caught his eye. According to the chronicler John of Marmoutier: The lecherous Fulk then fell passionately in love with the sister of Amaury de Montfort, whom no good man ever praised save for her beauty.

Bertrade de Montfort (c. 1070 – 14 February 1117) was the daughter of Simon I de Montfort and Agnes, Countess of Evreux. Her brother was Amaury de Montfort. First married to Fulk IV, Count of Anjou in 1089 and the mother of his son Fulk of Jerusalem, when the lovely Bertrade caught his eye. According to the chronicler John of Marmoutier: The lecherous Fulk then fell passionately in love with the sister of Amaury de Montfort, whom no good man ever praised save for her beauty.

Alice of Champagne (1195/1196–1246) was a Queen consort of Cyprus by her marriage to Hugh I of Cyprus. She was the daughter of Queen Isabella I of Jerusalem and her third husband Henry II, Count of Champagne. Alice was a regent of Cyprus for her minor son in 1218, and a nominal regent of Jerusalem for her great nephew in 1244-47. She and her sister Philippa spent part of their life fighting for their father's homeland of Champagne against another branch of their family.

Alice of Champagne was a Queen consort of Cyprus by her marriage to Hugh I of Cyprus. She was the daughter of Queen Isabella I of Jerusalem and her third husband Henry II, Count of Champagne.

Wings of Whimsy: Traditional Norwegian Bride - Rogaland

Norwegian Sunday: Bridal Crowns – Part I, Facts

Guta (Jutta/Judith/Bona) von Habsburg (13 March 1271 – 18 June 1297, Prague) - sixth daughter of King Rudolf. Married 24 January 1285 to King Wenceslaus II of Bohemia and became the mother of king Wenceslaus III of Bohemia, Poland and Hungary, of queen Anne of Bohemia (1290–1313), duchess of Carinthia, and of queen Elisabeth of Bohemia (1292–1330), countess of Luxembourg.

Guta (Jutta/Judith/Bona) von Habsburg (13 March 1271 – 18 June 1297, Prague) - sixth daughter of King Rudolf. Married 24 January 1285 to King Wenceslaus II of Bohemia and became the mother of king Wenceslaus III of Bohemia, Poland and Hungary, of queen Anne of Bohemia (1290–1313), duchess of Carinthia, and of queen Elisabeth of Bohemia (1292–1330), countess of Luxembourg.

Maria of Bulgaria was the second Empress consort of Henry of Flanders, Latin Emperor of Constantinople. She was a daughter of Kaloyan of Bulgaria. Her mother may have been his wife Anna of Cumania. On 11 June, Henry died in Thessaloniki. Maria was reportedly suspected of having poisoned him. Her further fate is unknown.

Maria of Bulgaria was the second Empress consort of Henry of Flanders, Latin Emperor of Constantinople. She was a daughter of Kaloyan of Bulgaria. Her mother may have been his wife Anna of Cumania. On 11 June, Henry died in Thessaloniki. Maria was reportedly suspected of having poisoned him. Her further fate is unknown.

Bertha of Sulzbach (1110s – August 29, 1159) was the first wife and Empress of Byzantine Emperor Manuel I Comnenus. Manuel delayed marrying her for three years, until shortly after Epiphany 1146, at which point she became empress and was renamed "Irene", a common name for foreign-born princesses. Irene was noted for shunning the frivolity of the luxurious Byzantine court; Basil of Ochrid, the archbishop of Thessalonica, praised her for her modesty and piety.

Bertha of Sulzbach (1110s – August 29, 1159) was the first wife and Empress of Byzantine Emperor Manuel I Comnenus. Manuel delayed marrying her for three years, until shortly after Epiphany 1146, at which point she became empress and was renamed "Irene", a common name for foreign-born princesses. Irene was noted for shunning the frivolity of the luxurious Byzantine court; Basil of Ochrid, the archbishop of Thessalonica, praised her for her modesty and piety.

Maria de Luna (1358 – Villarreal, 20 December 1406), was a queen consort of Aragon, as the spouse of King Martin I of Aragon. She was known as "La Grande", and is regarded as one of the most notable queens in Aragon. She was regent 1396-97. Maria was politically active and exerted influence upon society and policy, and was considered to exceed Martin as a ruler. She supported the poor financially, handled taxes, welcomed Jewish and Muslim refugees, aspired to stop the wars between noble…

Maria de Luna was a queen consort of Aragon, as the spouse of King Martin I of Aragon. She was known as "La Grande" (English: The Great), and is regarded as one of the most notable queens in Aragon.

Morphia of Melitene (d. c.1126/1127) was the wife of Baldwin II, King of Jerusalem. Morphia was the daughter of an Armenian nobleman, Gabriel, the ruler of Melitene. Melitene was a neighbour of the County of Edessa. Morphia did not interfere in the day to day politics of Jerusalem, but demonstrated her ability to take charge of affairs when events warranted it. Morphia was probably partially responsible for the Greek and Armenian cultural influences that appeared in the Latin kingdom.

Morphia of Melitene (d. c.1126/1127) was the wife of Baldwin II, King of Jerusalem. Morphia was the daughter of an Armenian nobleman, Gabriel, the ruler of Melitene. Melitene was a neighbour of the County of Edessa. Morphia did not interfere in the day to day politics of Jerusalem, but demonstrated her ability to take charge of affairs when events warranted it. Morphia was probably partially responsible for the Greek and Armenian cultural influences that appeared in the Latin kingdom.

Elisabeth of Pomerania (1347 - 1393). Holy Roman Empress as the second wife of Charles IV from 1363 until his death in 1376.

Elizabeth of Pomerania (c. Daughter of Bogislaw V, Duke of Pomerania and Elisabeth of Poland. Wife of Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor

Arda was the wife of King Baldwin I of Jerusalem. She was the first Queen consort of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. Her name is unrecorded in contemporary sources, but since the 17th century she has been traditionally called Arda. She was the daughter of a minor Armenian noble. Baldwin married her in 1097 after the death of his first wife. In 1105 Baldwin had the marriage annulled, supposedly because Arda had been unfaithful, or because she had been raped by pirates on the way to Jerusalem.

She was the daughter of a minor Armenian noble named Toros of Marash. Baldwin married her in Thoros promised Bezants as a dowry.

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