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Keeping an eye! : In EXPLORE 7th September 2015 | by Gaurav Agrawal @ San Diego

Keeping an eye! : In EXPLORE 7th September 2015 | by Gaurav Agrawal @ San Diego

Brown-headed Nuthatches eat insects and pine seeds. They are one of the few birds that exhibit tool use to find food. They carry a loose piece of bark in their beak and use this to pry up other pieces of bark in search of insects and spiders underneath. Sometimes they also use bark tools to cover up seed caches.

Brown-headed Nuthatches eat insects and pine seeds. They are one of the few birds that exhibit tool use to find food. They carry a loose piece of bark in their beak and use this to pry up other pieces of bark in search of insects and spiders underneath. Sometimes they also use bark tools to cover up seed caches.

Thrifty bird projects--including how to make a sunflower bouquet & a mosaic bird bath!

Thrifty bird projects--including how to make a sunflower bouquet & a mosaic bird bath!

One of the most abundant birds across North America, and one of the most boldly colored, the Red-winged Blackbird is a familiar sight atop cattails, along soggy roadsides, and on telephone wires. Glossy-black males have scarlet-and-yellow shoulder patches they can puff up or hide depending on how confident they feel. Females are a subdued, streaky brown, almost like a large, dark sparrow. In the North, their early arrival and tumbling song are happy indications of the return of spring.

One of the most abundant birds across North America, and one of the most boldly colored, the Red-winged Blackbird is a familiar sight atop cattails, along soggy roadsides, and on telephone wires. Glossy-black males have scarlet-and-yellow shoulder patches they can puff up or hide depending on how confident they feel. Females are a subdued, streaky brown, almost like a large, dark sparrow. In the North, their early arrival and tumbling song are happy indications of the return of spring.

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