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"Old Fezziwig, clapping his hands to stop the dance, cried out, 'Well done!'" — fourth illustration by E. A. Abbey for Dickens's "Christmas Stories"

"Old Fezziwig, clapping his hands to stop the dance, cried out, 'Well done!'" — fourth illustration by E. Abbey for Dickens's "Christmas Stories"

Anton Pieck Christmas Carol - Google zoeken

“It’s I, your uncle Scrooge. I have come to dinner. Will you let me in, Fred?” - A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, Arthur Rackham, 1915

"But, if you had judged from the numbers of people on their way to friendly gatherings, you might have thought that no one was at home to give them welcome when they got there, instead of every house expecting company, and piling up its fires half-chimney high. Blessings on it, how the Ghost exulted! How it bared its breadth of breast, and opened its capacious palm, and floated on, outpouring, with a generous hand, its bright and harmless mirth on everything within its reach! "

Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol, illustrated by Michael Foreman A favourite story in a wonderful edition.

December 24, It was a Turkey! He never could have stood upon his legs, that bird. He would have snapped 'em short off in a minute, like sticks of sealing-wax. "Why, it's impossible to carry that to Camden Town," said Scrooge. "You must have a cab."  Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

It was a Turkey! He never could have stood upon his legs, that bird. He would have snapped 'em short off in a minute, like sticks of sealing-wax.

Jacob Marley's ghost

The Ghost of Jacob Marley from Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol, figure by Creager Studios

' This boy here says you wish's to purchase this here prize turkey " .

'A Christmas Carol' by Charles Dickens where Ebenezer Scrooge buys a turkey for Bob Crachit on Christmas morning.

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