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Diindolylmethane, or DIM, is a phytochemical produced during the digestion of cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower. Besides eating these vegetables, you can obtain DIM through supplements.  Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/215001-what-is-a-dim-supplement/#ixzz2TziqEOE5

What Is a DIM Supplement?

Diindolylmethane, or DIM, is a phytochemical produced during the digestion of cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower. Besides eating these vegetables, you can obtain DIM through supplements. Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/215001-what-is-a-dim-supplement/#ixzz2TziqEOE5

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The anti-cancer medicine in broccoli (DIM nutrients) isn't released until you chew them to combine two phytochemicals - "Broccoli and related vegetables such as cabbage and Brussels sprouts naturally contain a chemical known as glucobrassicin. When these vegetables are crushed by chewing, a chemical reaction transforms glucobrassicin into indole-3-carbinol (I3C)."

The anti-cancer medicine in broccoli (DIM nutrients) isn't released until you chew them to combine two phytochemicals - "Broccoli and related vegetables such as cabbage and Brussels sprouts naturally contain a chemical known as glucobrassicin. When these vegetables are crushed by chewing, a chemical reaction transforms glucobrassicin into indole-3-carbinol (I3C)."

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