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http://bancroft.berkeley.edu/Exhibits/anthro/pics/large/jones_excavations.jpg

http://bancroft.berkeley.edu/Exhibits/anthro/pics/large/jones_excavations.jpg

Yokuts & Western Mono Myths (University of California Publications : Anthropological Records ; No. 5 : 1)) by A. H. Gayton

Yokuts & Western Mono Myths (University of California Publications : Anthropological Records ; No. 5 : 1)) by A. H. Gayton

Yokuts Baskets (The North American Indian, v. XIV. Norwood, MA, The Plimpton Press, 1924)

Yokuts Baskets (The North American Indian, v. XIV. Norwood, MA, The Plimpton Press)

Yokuts Baskets (The North American Indian, v. XIV. Norwood, MA, The Plimpton Press, 1924)

Pre-1800s Studies of pre-historic times tell us the first inhabitants of Tejon Ranch included five Native American tribes.  The largest area of the Ranch was inhabited by the Kitanemuk, who lived in the Tehachapi Mountains and foothills east of Castac Lake, which is now called Tejon Lake.  The other tribe occupying a large area of the Ranch was the Yokuts, who occupied the San Joaquin Valley, beginning just east of Grapevine Canyon.

Pre-1800s Studies of pre-historic times tell us the first inhabitants of Tejon Ranch included five Native American tribes. The largest area of the Ranch was inhabited by the Kitanemuk, who lived in the Tehachapi Mountains and foothills east of Castac Lake, which is now called Tejon Lake. The other tribe occupying a large area of the Ranch was the Yokuts, who occupied the San Joaquin Valley, beginning just east of Grapevine Canyon.

Muwekma Ohlone Chochenyo Song

Muwekma Ohlone Chochenyo Song

volume 14  facing: page  170 Yokuts kitchen utensils and milling-stone

volume 14 facing: page 170 Yokuts kitchen utensils and milling-stone

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