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German 'pocket battleship' Lutzow, date unknown, but her shadow indicates that she has a funnel cap and a platformed mast, thus during WW2 rather than prewar.  Despite her 11 in guns protection was not beyond heavy cruiser levels, and she was re designated as such in 1940: previously the 3 ships of the class were 'armoured ships'.

German 'pocket battleship' Lutzow, date unknown, but her shadow indicates that she has a funnel cap and a platformed mast, thus during WW2 rather than prewar. Despite her 11 in guns protection was not beyond heavy cruiser levels, and she was re designated as such in 1940: previously the 3 ships of the class were 'armoured ships'.

12 in battlecruiser SMS Hindenburg with 12 in 'Kaiser' class battleship SMS Konig Albert to starboard in Wilhelmshaven, 1917.  Hindenburg was the third of the 'Derfflinger' class, and was completed too late to see meaningful WW1 action.  Second sister Lutzow was sunk at Jutland - missed by Konig Albert, which was in refit.

12 in battlecruiser SMS Hindenburg with 12 in 'Kaiser' class battleship SMS…

Carrier aircraft of US 3rd Fleet attacking 14 in Kongo class battleship Haruna at Kure, Japan, 28 July 1945. The ship was left damaged and aground.

“US govt. announces they have now dropped mines in every Japanese harbour. Home islands are blockaded against ships bringing food or troops.

11 in battleship Scharnhorst as she appeared in her final few months, with distinctive camouflage scheme intended to disguise the length of the ship - taken in September 1943 during her joint attack with Tirpitz on the allied weather station at Spitzbergen (Operation Zitronella).  She was sunk on Boxing Day that year at the battle of the North Cape with only 36 survivors.

Kriegsmarine Scharnhorst class battlecruisers battleship KMS Scharnhorst during her final year 01

The oil fired, 5 ship 15 in Queen Elizabeth class were the best British battleships of WW1, being nearly as fast as contemporary battlecruisers and much more heavily armoured.  This is HMS Valiant following her sisters Barham (nearest) and Queen Elizabeth to sea in 1917.  They went on to have distinguished WW2 careers.

Clydebuilt Battleships: - HMS VALIANT 1916 and what looks like Battle Squadron. Picture could be post WWI by a couple of years

11 in battleship Scharnhorst, also in 1941, showing the different mainmast location to sister Gneisenau (photo nearby). She was sunk by the Royal Navy at the Battle of the North Cape on Boxing Day 1943: only 36 of her crew were picked up from the freezing Arctic waters.

11 in Scharnhorst (another photo nearby), this time taken in February

French battleships under British fire, Mers el Kebir, Algeria, July 1940.  After France's unilateral surrender the previous month a fleet led by HMS Hood destroyed these ships to prevent them being handed over to the Nazis: a significant indication of British intent to fight on without their former ally.

French battleships under British fire, Mers el Kebir, Algeria, July 1940. After France's unilateral surrender the previous month a fleet led by HMS Hood destroyed these ships to prevent them being handed over to the Nazis: a significant indication of British intent to fight on without their former ally.

British destroyer HMS Glowworm recoiling from German heavy cruiser Admiral Hipper after ramming her off Norway in April 1940 - it can be seen that her bows are stove in. This famous action won her Commanding Officer a posthumous Victoria Cross, not least because of tributes from her opponents.

A series of incredible photographs from the German heavy cruiser Admiral Hipper, captures the plight of HMS Glowworm, as it attacked with an indomitable spirit before being sunk on 8 April

Italian battleship Littorio exercising with her sister Vittorio Veneto shortly before Italy's entry into WWII in 1940.

Modern Italian 15 in battleship Littorio exercising with her sister Vittorio Veneto shortly before Italy's entry into in Both survived the war, though Littorio was seriously damaged by aerial torpedo during the famous Taranto raid in November that year.

German battlecruiser or battleship Scharnhorst shown underway after her refit in 1939. Intended as commerce raiders, the Scharnhorst-class battlecruisers were inferior to battleships, with only 11-inch guns, but outgunned any Allied heavy cruiser, and could lay waste to any convoy they caught.

The Scharnhorst with the Atlantic bow.

Kriegsmarine battleship KMS Gneisenau during operation Cerberus 02

A look at Operation Juno, the Kriegsmarine operation during World War II in which the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau sank the Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Glorious.

battleship admiral scheer

battleship admiral scheer

11 in battleship Gneisenau shortly before the famous 'Channel Dash' back to Germany from the French Atlantic Coast in company with sister Scharnhorst and heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen, February 1942. Mined en route, she was fatally damaged by RAF bombing at the end of the month whilst in dry dock for repair and never went to sea under her own power again.

11 in battleship Gneisenau shortly before the famous 'Channel Dash' back to Germany from the French Atlantic Coast in company with sister Scharnhorst and heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen, February 1942. Mined en route, she was fatally damaged by RAF bombing at the end of the month whilst in dry dock for repair and never went to sea under her own power again.

Sin embargo, los barcos ya habían sido avistados. Un crucero sueco los había identificado mientras transitaban por el Kattegat. La noticia fue inmediatamente transmitida al agregado naval británico en Estocolmo por los servicios de espionaje suecos. En unas horas, la noticia llegaba a Londres. La fuerza expedicionaria alemana también había sido avistada por observadores costeros de la resistencia noruega, que transmitieron igualmente el avistamiento a Londres

At sea en route to Norway, circa May prior to her Atlantic sortie. Photographed from the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen.

11 in battleship Scharnhorst pre-war, though from this perspective it could equally well be sister Gneisenau (a very similar captioned photo gives the game away). When reconstructed over 1939 both received funnel caps and raked bows, but Scharnhorst's main mast was moved much further aft: thereafter they were easy to tell apart.

Schlachtschiff Scharnhorst with the ship's company on deck. The ships commander Kapitän zur See Otto Ciliaxis is addressing the crew at the ships commisioning onJanuary

11 in battleship Scharnhorst, probably taken during Operation Berlin, her commerce raiding cruise in the North Atlantic in early 1941, undertaken with sister Gneisenau. From late 1939 the sisters were easy to tell apart: after modifications that year Gneisenau's mainmast remained adjacent to her funnel as built, whereas Scharnhorst's was moved further aft, as here.

11 in battleship Scharnhorst, probably taken during Operation Berlin, her…

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