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SSM William Parkes of British No. 3 Squadron, 2nd (Armoured) Irish Guards dead on his M4 Sherman tank, near Eindhoven, the Netherlands, 17 Sep 1944.

SSM William Parkes of British No. 3 Squadron, 2nd (Armoured) Irish Guards dead on his M4 Sherman tank, near Eindhoven, the Netherlands, 17 Sep 1944.

The British Mark V tank was an upgraded version of the Mark IV tank, deployed in 1918 and used in action in the closing months of World War I, in the Allied intervention in the Russian Civil War on the White Russian side, and by the Red Army. Thanks to Walter Wilson's epicyclic gear steering system, it was the first British heavy tank that required only one man to steer it

The British Mark V tank was an upgraded version of the Mark IV tank, deployed in 1918 and used in action in the closing months of World War I, in the Allied intervention in the Russian Civil War on the White Russian side, and by the Red Army. Thanks to Walter Wilson's epicyclic gear steering system, it was the first British heavy tank that required only one man to steer it

A knocked-out M4 Sherman tank knocked out makes a convenient observation post for a Waffen-SS trooper near Caen shortly after D-Day (June 1944).

A knocked-out M4 Sherman tank knocked out makes a convenient observation post for a Waffen-SS trooper near Caen shortly after D-Day (June 1944).

The US 101st ‘Screaming Eagles’ Airborne Division jumped into Holland in a daylight aerial assault on 17 September 1944, north of Eindhoven.  The bridges assigned to the 101st Airborne at Best and Son were a full 8 miles north of Eindhoven.  They would later refer to the road between Best and Son as "Hell's Highway."

The US 101st ‘Screaming Eagles’ Airborne Division jumped into Holland in a daylight aerial assault on 17 September 1944, north of Eindhoven. The bridges assigned to the 101st Airborne at Best and Son were a full 8 miles north of Eindhoven. They would later refer to the road between Best and Son as "Hell's Highway."

A smiling US Army Corporal William R. Kamp observes a German dead near the town of Frauwüllesheim, Feb 28, 1945.

A smiling US Army Corporal William R. Kamp observes a German dead near the town of Frauwüllesheim, Feb 28, 1945.

A sergeant of the 29th Infantry Division who was killed by sniper fire in Jülich, Germany/February 1945

A sergeant of the 29th Infantry Division who was killed by sniper fire in Jülich, Germany/February 1945

Sherman tanks fresh from the Baldwin Locomotive plant 1944 in the United States

Sherman tanks fresh from the Baldwin Locomotive plant 1944 in the United States

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