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Raven Rattle  Said to originate in the north, perhaps among the Tsimshian, the raven rattle is now considered an item of traditional regalia throughout the Northwest Coast. Chiefs use these rattles as part of their ceremonial dress in dances. This rattle depicts a shaman on the back of a raven. It has a frog in its mouth, another frog touches its tongue, and frogs are on the feet.

Tsimshian Raven Rattle (outside) Bella Bella, British Columbia - Canada; century Wood, pigments, rattles, cotton twine 14 x x cm Brooklyn Museum

Pair of Haida Polychromed Wood Shaman’s Rattles

Pair of Haida Polychromed Wood Shaman’s Rattles each in the form of a bird in flight, possibly a swan or oyster catcher, constructed of two hollowed sections joined together, with a long cylindrical handle, the upper section masterfully carved with.

Ceremonial rattle Pacific Northwest Coast and Possibly Haida artist, carved 19th century, collected 1932 Wood, paint Pacific Northwest Coast, North America L: 12 1/2 in, W: 3 in, D: 5 in (L: 31.7 cm, W: 7.6 cm, D: 12.7 cm) Peabody Essex Museum Purchase, 1932 E21054

Ceremonial rattle Pacific Northwest Coast and Possibly Haida artist, carved 19th century, collected 1932 Wood, paint Pacific Northwest Coast, North America L: 12 1/2 in, W: 3 in, D: 5 in (L: 31.7 cm, W: 7.6 cm, D: 12.7 cm) Peabody Essex Museum Purchase, 1932 E21054

Northwest Coast Polychromed Wood Ceremonial Dance Rattle Lot 57 estimate of $35,000 to $45,000. It sold for $74,500. Sotheby's, May 20, 2009

Art/Auctions: American Indian Art auction at Sotheby's May 2009

The Northwest Coastal People - Religion / Ceremonies / Art / Clothing

On the front of this shaman's curing rattle (left) is a Bear with the head of a Frog in its mouth. The back portrays a Sculpin head. Collected on Haida Gwaii in 1884 by Alexander McKenzie for Dr. Tolmie of the Hudson's Bay Company. CMC front, back)

A rare and important Kwakiutl headdress, British Columbia, Northwest Coast. According to Hawthorn (1967: 197), 'headdresses of the "helmet" type, as distinguished from the chief's ceremonial dancing hats, were usually wood carvings representing family crest birds and worn on top of the head, with the button blanket completing the costume. The headdresses were held firmly in place by a ribbon or string tied under the chin, and were worn by both men and women'...

A rare and important Kwakiutl headdress, British Columbia, Northwest Coast

‘Namgis artist (of the Kwakwaka’wakw), Thunderbird Transformation Mask, 19th c. (from Alert Bay, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada), cedar, pigment, leather, nails, metal plate, open: 78.7 x 114.3 x 119.4 cm; closed 52.1 x 43.2 x 74.9 cm (Brooklyn Museum)

Brooklyn Museum Exhibition: Life, Death, and Transformation in the Americas (Thunderbird Transformation Mask)

Raven Rattle [Skidegate, British Columbia; Haida] (89.4.611) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Raven rattle Date: century Geography: Skidegate, British Columbia, Canada Culture: Native American (Tsimshian) Medium: Cedar, pebbles, polychrome

Raven rattles such as this one were used by a chief in ceremonies. The different sounds and thyrhms produced by a pair of such rattles enhanced the drama of his oratory. On his rattle, the Raven supports a shaman initiate who is drawing inspiration and knowledge from the animal world through the link between his tongue and that of a mythical bird.

Raven rattles such as this one were used by a chief in ceremonies. The different sounds and thyrhms produced by a pair of such rattles enhanced the drama of his oratory. On his rattle, the Raven supports a shaman initiate who is drawing inspiration and knowledge from the animal world through the link between his tongue and that of a mythical bird.

tlingit house posts (North Pacific Coast) with geometric animal patterns from Penn Museum, Philadelphia PA.

tlingit house posts (North Pacific Coast) with geometric animal patterns from Penn Museum, Philadelphia PA.

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