Explore Journal, Anglaise, and more!

June 7-10, 1863: James wrote about finally leaving Nashville, marching to Murfreesboro, and standing guard on picket duty: "Picket duty is very pleasant and exciting...Any enterprising fellow can have a shot whenever he wants to, by risking more or less his own life." Pictured: The Army of the Potomac - the Picket Guard, Harper's Weekly, November 2, 1861. Missouri History Museum.

Finally, after almost six months of provost duty in Nashville, James and the rest of the Kansas Infantry regiment received orders from General William S.

Drummer Louis D. B. Somerby of Company A, 48th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment and Company M, 2nd Massachusetts Heavy Artillery Regiment

[Drummer Louis D. Somerby of Company A, Massachusetts Infantry Regiment and Company M, Massachusetts Heavy Artillery Regiment] (LOC)

William Henry Seward, before and after the attempt on his life.

Powell slashed Seward around the face and neck multiple times and believed him dead. But, although heavily disfigured, the Secretary of State survived.

Gratiot Street Prison. Oil on canvas, painting by Martin Stadler, ca. 1864. Located at the corner of Gratiot and 8th Streets in St. Louis, the Gratiot Street Prison was the largest war prison in Missouri during the Civil War. Run by the Union Army, it was unique because it housed not only Confederate prisoners-of-war, but also guerrillas, spies and confederate sympathizers. It was demolished in 1878. The location is now the site of Nestle Purina Headquarters. Missouri History Museum

Gratiot Street Prison was the largest war prison in Missouri during the Civil War. Run by the Union Army, it was unique because it housed not only Confederate prisoners-of-war, but also guerrillas, spies and confederate sympathizers. It was demolished in

images of american history - Google Search

January 1835 – In the first assassination attempt against a President of the United States, Richard Lawrence attempts to shoot president Andrew Jackson, but fails and is subdued by a crowd, including several congressmen.

In his second letter of Oct. 10, 1862, James wrote about the results of the battle. Following the battle at Perryville, James and the other men in his company spent the night on the field among the dead and wounded.

Camp at Goodnight SpringOct 1862 My Dear Molly I had to stop in the middle of my story much as the New York Ledger does at the most interesting part, but I will improve a rainy hour under a wagon

Meet Fred Johnson of Wilmington, an African-American whose ancestors fought in the Civil War and who now works tirelessly to honor their service. "Our State" the television program in partnership between UNC-TV and Our State Magazine, with generous support from BB This segment first aired on April 5, 2012.

Meet Fred Johnson of Wilmington, an African-American whose ancestors fought in the Civil War and who now works tirelessly to honor their service.

OUR STARVED SOLDIERS.—FROM PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN AT UNITED STATES GENERAL HOSPITAL, ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND

Front Page Harper's Weekly, June These lithographs, made from photographs of recently released prisoners, were printed on the front page of the June 1864 issue of Harper's Weekly and accompanied by an article on the treatment of prisoners in Richmond.

Slave Reunion 1917: From Left to Right, Lewis Martin, age 100; Martha Elizabeth Banks, age 104; Amy Ware, age 103; and Reverend S.P. Drew, Born Free - Picture taken by Harris & Ewing

Slaves Reunion - Lewis Martin, Age 100 Martha Elizabeth Banks, Age 104 Amy Ware, Age 103 Reverend S. Drew, Born Free circa 1917 by Harris & Ewing

Nettie Hunt, sitting on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court building, explains the significance of the court's May 17, 1954, desegregation ruling to her daughter, Nikie. (UPI Tele/Files, New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Collection, Prints and Photographs Division)

Nettie Hunt, sitting on the steps of the U. Supreme Court building, explains the significance of the court's May desegregation ruling to her daughter, Nikie.

Pinterest
Search