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Wonderful start to the day.  Dorothy Height appears in Google's main search bar.

Wonderful start to the day. Dorothy Height appears in Google's main search bar.

In our new blog post for Women's History Month, learn about Dorothy Height, unsung hero of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement: http://blog.givelify.com/national-womens-history-month-dorothy-height

In our new blog post for Women's History Month, learn about Dorothy Height, unsung hero of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement: http://blog.givelify.com/national-womens-history-month-dorothy-height

Dorothy Height Quote - © Jone Johnson Lewis, adapted from an image © Getty Images / Hulton Archive

16 Great Quotes From African American Women

Dorothy Height Quote - © Jone Johnson Lewis, adapted from an image © Getty Images / Hulton Archive

Ella Baker. Dorothy Height. Septima Clark. Diane Nash. Fannie Lou Hamer. Who were these firebrands? Video clips of these women in action made me marvel at their vision and daring. Here, as the first of WVFC’s articles in honor of Black History Month, are their stories.

Ella Baker. Dorothy Height. Septima Clark. Diane Nash. Fannie Lou Hamer. Who were these firebrands? Video clips of these women in action made me marvel at their vision and daring. Here, as the first of WVFC’s articles in honor of Black History Month, are their stories.

Dorothy Irene Height was an  administrator, educator, and civil rights activist. She mainly focused on the issues of African-American women, including unemDorothy Irene Height was an  administrator, educator, and civil rights activist. She mainly focused on the issues of African-American women, including unemployment, illiteracy, and voter awareness. She has often been referred to as the “godmother of the women’s movement” of civil rights. Here are a few other amazing facts to know about…

Dorothy Irene Height was an administrator, educator, and civil rights activist. She mainly focused on the issues of African-American women, including unemDorothy Irene Height was an administrator, educator, and civil rights activist. She mainly focused on the issues of African-American women, including unemployment, illiteracy, and voter awareness. She has often been referred to as the “godmother of the women’s movement” of civil rights. Here are a few other amazing facts to know about…

Blacks wax museum co-founder stresses passing history to youth  A wax figure of the late Dorothy Height, former chair and president emerita of the National Council of Negro Women, stands in the lobby of Club Meade for the installation's Black History Month observance on Feb. 23. Height is just one of many wax figures on display at the National Great Blacks In Wax Museum in Baltimore. (Photo by Sarah Pastrana)

Blacks wax museum co-founder stresses passing history to youth A wax figure of the late Dorothy Height, former chair and president emerita of the National Council of Negro Women, stands in the lobby of Club Meade for the installation's Black History Month observance on Feb. 23. Height is just one of many wax figures on display at the National Great Blacks In Wax Museum in Baltimore. (Photo by Sarah Pastrana)

Remembering Dr. Dorothy Height

Remembering Dr. Dorothy Height

theshipsupernatural: “Women Often Forgotten in Black HistoryDiane Nash Septima Poinsette Clark Fannie Lou Hamer Daisy Bates Anna Arnold Hedgemen Dorothy Height Feel free to add more! ”

theshipsupernatural: “Women Often Forgotten in Black HistoryDiane Nash Septima Poinsette Clark Fannie Lou Hamer Daisy Bates Anna Arnold Hedgemen Dorothy Height Feel free to add more! ”

"Dr. Height was regarded by President Barack Obama as “the godmother of the Civil Rights Movement.” She served as the president of the National Council of Negro Women for over two decades and was instrumental in the integration of all YWCA centers in 1946."

35 Queens Of Black History Who Deserve Much More Glory

"Dr. Height was regarded by President Barack Obama as “the godmother of the Civil Rights Movement.” She served as the president of the National Council of Negro Women for over two decades and was instrumental in the integration of all YWCA centers in 1946."

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