Explore Jasmine Tea, Chengdu and more!

“You do have to maintain tradition, but it’s not a display in a museum,” said Yang Wen, a chef whose restaurant, Lotus Shadow, features refined dishes, like braised shrimp infused with jasmine tea, that are a world away from the homespun fare favored by old-school revivalists. (Photo: Adam Dean for The New York Times)

In Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan Province, the region’s famed cuisine is more popular than ever.

“It’s preserving the essence of tradition while meeting modern expectations,” said Ms. Yang, a rare woman among the legions of male cooks here. “Sichuanese food has never stood still.” Here, chefs at her restaurant. (Photo: Adam Dean for The New York Times)

Sichuan Cuisine, Imperiled by Success

Stewards of the cuisine worry that the tradition behind this pillar of Chinese cooking is being burned by overly spicy dishes.

About two years ago, when the chef Daniel Humm developed a dish — celery root braised in a pig’s bladder with black truffles — and presented it as a delectable pale sphere on a white plate, he had a glimpse of the less-is-more aesthetic he’d been seeking.

At Eleven Madison Park, a New Minimalism

About two years ago, when the chef Daniel Humm developed a dish — celery root braised in a pig’s bladder with black truffles — and presented it as a delectable pale sphere on a white plate, he had a glimpse of the less-is-more aesthetic he’d been seeking.

The strongest dishes are exquisitely controlled plates of cold vegetables or protein that could easily fit into the lineup of a marathon menu at Momofuku Ko, the tasting counter where Nishi’s executive chef, Joshua Pinsky, cooked for more than five years. (Photo: Devin Yalkin for The New York Times)

At Momofuku Nishi, David Chang’s Magic Shows a Little Wear

The strongest dishes are exquisitely controlled plates of cold vegetables or protein that could easily fit into the lineup of a marathon menu at Momofuku Ko, the tasting counter where Nishi’s executive chef, Joshua Pinsky, cooked for more than five years. (Photo: Devin Yalkin for The New York Times)

Sichuanese cooking has been conquering the world. It has become China’s favorite out-of-home dining, sold in countless restaurants that often advertise its trademark chile heat. Here, a wholesale spice market frequented by chefs in Chengdu, China. (Photo: Adam Dean for The New York Times)

Cooking with the New York Times

In Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan Province, the region’s famed cuisine is more popular than ever. But traditionalists worry it’s drowning in spice.

In Chengdu, Xiong A’bing, a chef who runs a chain of restaurants called Rustic Impressions, specializing in robustly traditional dishes, said people would tire of the race toward spicy novelty. (Photo: Adam Dean for The New York Times)

Sichuan Cuisine, Imperiled by Success

In Chengdu, Xiong A’bing, a chef who runs a chain of restaurants called Rustic Impressions, specializing in robustly traditional dishes, said people would tire of the race toward spicy novelty. (Photo: Adam Dean for The New York Times)

“Sichuanese cuisine really faces a crisis,” said Wang Kaifa, a 71-year-old chef who has been leading a campaign against what he sees as the creeping debasement of the region’s celebrated cooking. (Photo: Adam Dean for The New York Times)

Cooking with the New York Times

“Sichuanese cuisine really faces a crisis,” said Wang Kaifa, a chef who has been leading a campaign against what he sees as the creeping debasement of the region’s celebrated cooking. (Photo: Adam Dean for The New York Times)

Porchetta is a simple and festive preparation, like a whole pig roast in the American South. It’s from the Umbrian farming tradition, not a professional butcher’s masterpiece like the famous salamis from nearby Norcia. (Photo: Chris Warde-Jones for The New York Times)

Paying Tribute to Porchetta, the Ancient Italian Pig Roast

Porchetta is a simple and festive preparation, like a whole pig roast in the American South. It’s from the Umbrian farming tradition, not a professional butcher’s masterpiece like the famous salamis from nearby Norcia. (Photo: Chris Warde-Jones for The New York Times)

The restaurant opened in November on Smith Street. The chef Armando Litiatco was born in the Philippines and raised in Daly City, Calif. (Photo: Danny Ghitis for The New York Times)

Filipino Food With Subtlety, and a Splash of 7Up, at F.O.B.

A new restaurant in Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn, combines a grandmotherly vibe with dishes from a Daniel alum.

From cookbooks and childhood memories, and through trial and error, Chinese-American chefs are feeling their way into one of the world’s most complex, ancient and demanding culinary traditions. Here, the China-quiles at Fung Tu. (Photo: Francesco Sapienza for The New York Times)

Chinese-American Chefs Start a Culinary Conversation With the Past

From cookbooks and childhood memories, and through trial and error, American-Chinese cooks are feeling their way into one of the world’s most complex, ancient and demanding culinary traditions. Here, the China-quiles at Fung Tu.

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