Explore World War Ii, Aircraft, and more!

Explore related topics

http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z301/theclotheshorse/theclotheshorse2/women2.jpg

WWII War Effort WOMEN Do the job he left behind art

4 propaganda for women to join workforce. "Do the job he left behind. Apply US Employment Service"

World War II P-40 Warhawk Pursuit Fighter planes from the Flying Tigers Squadron in China. The real deal.

Hell's Angels, the Squadron of the American Volunteer Group "Flying Tigers", 28 May 1942

Night Witches: Night Witches were russian lady bombers in WW2. They had the oldest, noisiest, crappiest planes in the entire world. The planes were so noisy that to stop Germans from hearing them coming and starting up their anti aircraft guns, the Witches climbed to a certain height to coast down to German positions, drop their bombs, restart their engines in midair, and get back to base.

Night Witches: The Female Fighter Pilots of World War II

Night Witches: The Female Fighter Pilots of World War II Members of the Night Bomber Regiment decorated their planes with flowers . and dropped tons of bombs.

World War II aircrafts.

World War II Aircraft

This picture shows a lot of the aircrafts that were used throughout World War II and what they were used for. Most aircrafts throughout the World War II had specific jobs and had greater advantages in specific things than other aircrafts.

A Chinese soldier guards a line of American P-40 fighter planes, painted with the shark-face emblem of the `Flying Tigers,’ at a flying field somewhere in China. Description from pinterest.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

Plane of the Day - Curtiss P-40 Warhawk

The Curtiss was the United States' best fighter available in large numbers when World War II began Mais

About 1,100 young women flew military aircraft stateside during World War II as part of a program called Women Airforce Service Pilots — WASP for short. These civilian volunteers ferried and tested planes so male pilots could head to combat duty.

Female WWII Pilots: The Original Fly Girls

Four pilots leaving their plane, "Pistol Packin' Mama" at the four-engine school at Lockbourne AAF, Ohio, during WASP ferry training Flying Fortress. "Pistol Packin Mama" was a AF assigned to the BG flying out of Italy during

Nancy Harkness Love, September 22, 1942. With the approach of World War II, Love recognized the coming need for pilots to ferry aircraft and identified highly qualified women pilots who could perform such duties. In September 1942, the Army Air Corps' Air Transport Command approved the creation of a temporary, civilian women's flying corps, the Women's Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron (WAFS), under her direction. She is pictured here leaning against a Fairchild PT-19A. SI-96-15604

Nancy Harkness Love, September With the approach of World War II, Love recognized the coming need for pilots to ferry aircraft and identified highly qualified women pilots who could perform such duties. In September the Army Air Corps' Air

Pinterest
Search