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"7 Tenets of Neuroplasticity". • Change can occur only when the brain is in the mood.• Change strengthens the connections between neurons engaged at the same time.• Neurons that fire together, wire together. • Strong emotions strengthen the connections.• Brain plasticity is a two-way street.• Memory is crucial for learning.• Motivation is a key factor.

"7 Tenets of Neuroplasticity". • Change can occur only when the brain is in the mood.• Change strengthens the connections between neurons engaged at the same time.• Neurons that fire together, wire together. • Strong emotions strengthen the connections.• Brain plasticity is a two-way street.• Memory is crucial for learning.• Motivation is a key factor.

Webinar: 7 Ways to Be More Productive — and Crush It At Work

Webinar: 7 Ways to Be More Productive — and Crush It At Work

Psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, Dr. Norman Doidge talks about an astonishing new science called neuroplasticity, which is overthrowing the centuries-old notion that the human brain is immutable. His new book, "The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories Of Personal Triumph From The Frontiers Of Brain Science" will permanently alter the way we look at our brains, human nature, and human potential.

Psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, Dr. Norman Doidge talks about an astonishing new science called neuroplasticity, which is overthrowing the centuries-old notion that the human brain is immutable. His new book, "The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories Of Personal Triumph From The Frontiers Of Brain Science" will permanently alter the way we look at our brains, human nature, and human potential.

The Brain That Changes Itself Pt 3

The Brain That Changes Itself Pt 3

Why do teenagers seem so much more impulsive, so much less self-aware than grown-ups? Cognitive neuroscientist Sarah-Jayne Blakemore compares the prefrontal cortex in adolescents to that of adults, to show us how typically “teenage” behavior is caused by the growing and developing brain.

Why do teenagers seem so much more impulsive, so much less self-aware than grown-ups? Cognitive neuroscientist Sarah-Jayne Blakemore compares the prefrontal cortex in adolescents to that of adults, to show us how typically “teenage” behavior is caused by the growing and developing brain.

Neurofeedback Explained

Neurofeedback Explained

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