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ASSUR RELIEF 10TH-6TH BCE Servants carrying hunting gear. Stone bas-relief (7th BCE) from the palace of Ashurbanipal in Niniveh, Mesopotamia (Iraq). British Museum, London, Great Britain

Stone bas-relief BCE) from the palace of Ashurbanipal in Niniveh, Mesopotamia (Iraq).

Winged protective spirit or apkallu, guarded entrance to king's private quarters, carries goat and giant ear of corn, alabaster wall panel relief, North West Palace, Nimrud, Kalhu, Iraq, neo-assyrian, 875BC-860BC

winged protective spirit or apkallu; guarded entrance to king's private quarters; carries goat and giant ear of corn; wears a kilt and embroidered robe and bead necklace; also wears armlets, wristlets with rosettes and sandal

Tribute bearer, may be Phoenician, brings a pair of apes, wall panel relief, North West Palace, Nimrud, Kalhu, Iraq, neo-assyrian, 865BC-860BC

Tribute bearer, may be Phoenician, brings a pair of apes, wall panel relief…

Dur Sharrukin

ancientart: “Genie with a poppy flower. Relief from the Palace of king Sargon II at Dur Sharrukin in Assyria (now Khorsabad in Iraq), BC. Courtesy & currently located at the Louvre, France. Photo taken by Marie-Lan Nguyen.

Del tiempo de Asurbanipal

Assyrian - Winged genie with spath-(pollen), and pollen/spath-bucket before a Tree of Life panel-(at other museum), giving its blessing. Relief from the north wall of the Palace of king Sargon II at Dur Sharrukin in Assyria (now Khorsabad in Iraq), BC.

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Relief from the palace of King Sargon II in his capital city of Dur-Sharrukin (Khorsabad)

Relief from the palace of King Sargon II in his capital city of Dur-Sharrukin (Khorsabad) Assyrian king 722 bce

Relief depicting a Winged Genius from the Northwest Palace of Ashurnasirpal II at the Assyrian Imperial capital of Nimrud (883-859 BCE). Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY.   Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Relief depicting a Winged Genius from the Northwest Palace of Ashurnasirpal II at the Assyrian Imperial capital of Nimrud BCE). Now at the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY. Photo by Babylon Chronicle

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