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Legend has it that if one tells a lie with one's hand inside La Bocca della Verita ("The Mouth of Truth"), it will be bitten clean off. Head to the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin on the banks of the Tiber to put the myth to the test.

Rome: free things to do

Legend has it that if one tells a lie with one's hand inside La Bocca della Verita ("The Mouth of Truth"), it will be bitten clean off. Head to the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin on the banks of the Tiber to put the myth to the test.

Roman, BOCA te necesita

Roman, BOCA te necesita

They have the best of each of us. This is why I will NEVER insult their dad around them. There is too much of him in them.

They have the best of each of us. This is why I will NEVER insult their dad around them. There is too much of him in them.

Mouth of Truth: in a very simple church, Santa Maria, Cosmedin, Rome, Italy - movie "Roman Holiday" so they say if you are honest you can put your hand in and pull it out but if you're not...well? I still have my hand :) LA BOCA della verita

Mouth of Truth: in a very simple church, Santa Maria, Cosmedin, Rome, Italy - movie "Roman Holiday" so they say if you are honest you can put your hand in and pull it out but if you're not...well? I still have my hand :) LA BOCA della verita

In Greek mythology Medusa ("guardian, protectress")[1] was a monster, a Gorgon, generally described as having the face of a hideous human female with living venomous snakes in place of hair. Gazing directly into her eyes would turn onlookers to stone. Most sources describe her as the daughter of Phorcys and Ceto,[2] though the author Hyginus (Fabulae, 151) interposes a generation and gives Medusa another chthonic pair as parents.

In Greek mythology Medusa ("guardian, protectress")[1] was a monster, a Gorgon, generally described as having the face of a hideous human female with living venomous snakes in place of hair. Gazing directly into her eyes would turn onlookers to stone. Most sources describe her as the daughter of Phorcys and Ceto,[2] though the author Hyginus (Fabulae, 151) interposes a generation and gives Medusa another chthonic pair as parents.

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