Explore African Textiles, Fabric Patterns, and more!

Africa | Panel (for a turban) from Nigeria | Cotton; warp face plain weave, patterned by warp stripes and extra-weft floats inserted in shed A only, bound by every 10th foundation warp | c. Prior to 1969

Woman's head tie of light tan and green striped fabric patterned by bands containing zigzag motifs in alternating yellow and blue. Fringed at both ends.

Africa | Adire cloth from the Yoruba people of Nigeria | ca. 1950s | Cotton; indigo resist

Africa ~ Adire cloth from the Yoruba people of Nigeria ~ ~ Cotton, indigo resist

Blog | Cool and Cheap: SUPERFÍCIES

Items similar to NOT FOR SALE- Niko: wall hanging- woven cotton & silk scraps on Etsy

Africa | Prestige cloth ~ kpokpo ~ from the Mende people of Sierra Leone | Early 20th century | Strip woven cotton; this Kpokpo is composed of strips over 13 feet long.

Kpokpo, Sierra Leone cloths of prodigious lengths, would hang at important occasions such as state ceremonies and funerals as striking displays of wealth and social position.

Hakucho-ori or swan weaving - An indigo dyed cotton cloth that shows striations of woven swan down, made in Japan, which was worn by well-to-do women.

Hakucho-ori or swan weaving - An indigo dyed cotton cloth that shows striations of woven swan down, made in Japan, which was worn by well-to-do women.

Xuta. The weavers and craftsmen behind the range of products under Xuta are part of communities and families that have spun, woven, printed and dyed for generations.

Textile by Xuta (pronounced hoo-tah, means thread). The weavers & craftsmen behind the range of products under Xuta are part of communities and families that have spun, woven, printed & dyed for generations. Text & image via Selvedge

Chief's cloth from member of a society called Ogboni or Oshugbo among the Ijebu Yoruba people of south western Nigeria. The designs are said to represent water spirits. Exceptional C19th example, private collection, London.

Chief's cloth from member of a society called Ogboni or Oshugbo among the Ijebu Yoruba people of south western Nigeria. The designs are said to represent water spirits.

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