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Trivalve | Look for oddballs. Occasionally clams will regrow their siphons if clipped by a crab. Normally they have only two. This gaper clam has two excurrent siphons (left) and one incurrent siphon (right).

Trivalve | Look for oddballs. Occasionally clams will regrow their siphons if clipped by a crab. Normally they have only two. This gaper clam has two excurrent siphons (left) and one incurrent siphon (right).

Cockles (Clinocardium nuttallii) have short siphons and for that reason live close to the sediment/water interface. Photo showing close view of siphons of a cockle (Clinocardium nuttallii).

Cockles (Clinocardium nuttallii) have short siphons and for that reason live close to the sediment/water interface. Photo showing close view of siphons of a cockle (Clinocardium nuttallii).

photograph showing geoduck Panopea abrupta siphons, both excurrent and incurrent siphons showing RR

photograph showing geoduck Panopea abrupta siphons, both excurrent and incurrent siphons showing RR

Photo of a Geoduck Clam (Panopea generosa)

Photo of a Geoduck Clam (Panopea generosa)

gaper neck - There are two species of gaper clams in Oregon. Tresus capax is by far the most common, Tresus nuttalli is found in most estuaries that have gapers but are rarely harvested.

gaper neck - There are two species of gaper clams in Oregon. Tresus capax is by far the most common, Tresus nuttalli is found in most estuaries that have gapers but are rarely harvested.

A family of Banded Mongoose in the Kruger National Park

A family of Banded Mongoosed Photo by Jan van Biljon — National Geographic Your Shot

Photo of a Geoduck Clam (Panopea generosa)

Photo of a Geoduck Clam (Panopea generosa)

Photo of a Geoduck Clam (Panopea generosa).

Photo of a Geoduck Clam (Panopea generosa).

Orangutans' extremely low reproductive rate makes their populations highly vulnerable. Females give birth to one infant at a time about every 3-5 years, so these species can take a long time to recover from population declines. With human pressure only increasing, orangutans face an increasing risk of extinction.

Species And Subspecies: an Endangered Species Spotlight Topic

Southwestern Willow Flycatcher nest. The SWWF has been Federally listed as endangered since 1995, and is threatened by loss of habitat and other pressures brought with increased populations within the range.

The SWWF has been Federally listed as endangered since and is threatened by loss of habitat and other pressures brought with increased populations within the range.

The Woodchuck is also called the Groundhog. They're closely related to squirrels and they build impressive homes in the soil. A groundhog’s burrow can be anywhere from 8-66 feet long, with multiple exits and a number of chambers.

The Woodchuck is also called the Groundhog. They're closely related to squirrels and they build impressive homes in the soil. A groundhog’s burrow can be anywhere from feet long, with multiple exits and a number of chambers.

Burrowing tarantulas: Their need for speed is lessened by the fact that they are able to retreat into an underground burrow to safety.  ARANTULAS: Alive And Up Close: Burrowing and Terrestrial Tarantulas

Burrowing tarantulas: Their need for speed is lessened by the fact that they are able to retreat into an underground burrow to safety. ARANTULAS: Alive And Up Close: Burrowing and Terrestrial Tarantulas

Largest Tuatara: There are only two species of tuatara, both of which are found exclusively in the islands off the main coast of New Zealand. Of the two, the greatly endangered Brothers Island tuatara (Sphenodon guntheri) is the largest. It can (2 ft 6 in) long and have a maximum weight of 1.4 kg (3 lb 1 oz).

Largest Tuatara: There are only two species of tuatara, both of which are found exclusively in the islands off the main coast of New Zealand. Of the two, the greatly endangered Brothers Island tuatara (Sphenodon guntheri) is the largest. It can (2 ft 6 in) long and have a maximum weight of 1.4 kg (3 lb 1 oz).

Northern Shoveler Male | Eclipse Plumage (from May through August): Duller. Head and breast brownish black speckled with whitish or tan. Back black with tan feather edges. Flanks light brown. Blue patch on the forewing. May show indistinct white crescent on face behind bill. Eyes yellow.

Northern Shoveler Male | Eclipse Plumage (from May through August): Duller. Head and breast brownish black speckled with whitish or tan. Back black with tan feather edges. Flanks light brown. Blue patch on the forewing. May show indistinct white crescent on face behind bill. Eyes yellow.

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