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The Vickers Medium tank Mk.I was another famous interwar British tank. It was of the same early twenties generation, fitted with a full traverse three-man turret (for the first time in the world), new suspension system, and a quick-firing 3 pdr (47 mm/1.85 in) gun. 200 were built and phased out for training in 1938. The next Medium Mk.II was mostly similar but improved during many years. Production stopped in 1934. Many were reactivated and served in secondary duties during early WW2.

The Vickers Medium tank Mk.I was another famous interwar British tank. It was of the same early twenties generation, fitted with a full traverse three-man turret (for the first time in the world), new suspension system, and a quick-firing 3 pdr (47 mm/1.85 in) gun. 200 were built and phased out for training in 1938. The next Medium Mk.II was mostly similar but improved during many years. Production stopped in 1934. Many were reactivated and served in secondary duties during early WW2.

World War I in Photos: Technology - Holt gas-electric tank - the first American tank in 1917. The Holt did not get beyond the prototype stage, proving too heavy and inefficient in design.

World War I in Photos: Technology

World War I in Photos: Technology - Holt gas-electric tank - the first American tank in 1917. The Holt did not get beyond the prototype stage, proving too heavy and inefficient in design.

BRITISH ARMY NORMANDY 1944 (B 6345)   A captured German PzKpfw IV tank( long barrel gun version) at 27th Armoured Brigade workshops, 3 July 1944. This vehicle had the turret number '612'.

BRITISH ARMY NORMANDY 1944 (B 6345) A captured German PzKpfw IV tank( long barrel gun version) at 27th Armoured Brigade workshops, 3 July 1944. This vehicle had the turret number '612'.

The Marder III is the name for a series of World War II German tank destroyers built on the chassis of the Panzer 38(t). The German word Marder means "marten" in English. They were in production from 1942 to 1944 and served on all fronts until the end of the war. The Marders were mechanically reliable, as with all vehicles based on the Czechoslovak 38t chassis. Their firepower was sufficient to destroy the majority of Soviet tanks on the battlefield at combat range.

The Marder III is the name for a series of World War II German tank destroyers built on the chassis of the Panzer 38(t). The German word Marder means "marten" in English. They were in production from 1942 to 1944 and served on all fronts until the end of the war. The Marders were mechanically reliable, as with all vehicles based on the Czechoslovak 38t chassis. Their firepower was sufficient to destroy the majority of Soviet tanks on the battlefield at combat range.

15cm Panzerfeldhaubitze 18M auf GW III/IV (Sf) Sd Kfz 165 Hummel. Around 700 were built & given to Panzer-Divisions. They were very useful due to their mobility. First saw action in July 1943 during Operation 'Zitadelle' (Kursk)

15cm Panzerfeldhaubitze 18M auf GW III/IV (Sf) Sd Kfz 165 Hummel. Around 700 were built & given to Panzer-Divisions. They were very useful due to their mobility. First saw action in July 1943 during Operation 'Zitadelle' (Kursk)

Jagdtiger was the heaviest tank of WW2. It was also a piece of junk. Built by the Germans, only 88 were built. It weighed over 70 tons. It required meticulous care and training and most broke down before combat. When used properly, it was devastating. The 128mm round could destroy vehicles even after going through buildings. Its best success was in the last week of the war when a handful destroyed a battalion of American Shermans in a single day. The Germans still surrendered the next day.

Jagdtiger was the heaviest tank of WW2. It was also a piece of junk. Built by the Germans, only 88 were built. It weighed over 70 tons. It required meticulous care and training and most broke down before combat. When used properly, it was devastating. The 128mm round could destroy vehicles even after going through buildings. Its best success was in the last week of the war when a handful destroyed a battalion of American Shermans in a single day. The Germans still surrendered the next day.

http://ww2today.com/18th-june-1942-the-british-retreat-in-the-desert-continues

http://ww2today.com/18th-june-1942-the-british-retreat-in-the-desert-continues

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