Mantua, ca. 1720,  England.

Mantua England, Britain (made) ca. 1720 (made)

back of Mantua, England, ca. 1720

Mantua

Afternoon dress, ca 1785 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum - In the 1770s & 1780s printed cotton fabrics began to replace silk in popularity for women’s gowns. This gown has a dotted ground & is printed in a repeating pattern of floral sprays. The gown has a fitted back & open front below the waist, revealing a petticoat of the same fabric. The lack of decoration and use of cotton instead of silk shows that this gown was probably worn during summer afternoons rather than for evening…

Gown Place of origin: England, Great Britain Date: ca. 1785 Materials and Techniques: Printed cotton, lined with linen, hand-sewn Museum number:

Wedding ensemble, 1780 From the Chertsey Museum via Vogue Paris - Fripperies and Fobs

Silk brocade gown and petticoat, silk covered straw hat and silk satin shoes, 1780 Worn by Jane Bailey for her marriage to James Wickham Image reproduced by kind permission of the Olive Matthews Collection, Chertsey Museum. Photograph by John Chase.

I LOVE Victorian era dresses. I'd wear them all the time if I could. This one is absolutely gorgeous.

Marie Antoinette Victorian Dress Ball Gown Prom Wedding 142 M

18th century silk dress

Dress ca. silk ca. 1680 From Cora Ginsburg LLC

Robe à l'anglaise | ca. 1780 | Colonial Williamsburg This dress is cotton with silk embroidery - which just goes to show how spectacular an “average” material can become.

Robe à l'anglaise ~ ~ Colonial Williamsburg ~ This dress is cotton with silk embroidery

Mantua  Place of origin: England, Great Britain (made)  Date: ca. 1720 (made)  Materials and Techniques: Silver brocaded silk, lined and faced with silk  Museum number: T.88 to C-1978 "By the early 18th century, the mantua was worn by women as formal day wear. The pale blue silk of this example is brocaded in silver in a large-scale pattern of fantastic fruits and leaves, a typical design for the 1720s. The train of the gown is folded up and the sides held back with a loop and button."

Mantua

Mantua, England, ca.1720, Silver brocaded silk, lined & faced with silk. The pale blue brocaded silk is in a large-scale pattern of fantastic fruits and leaves, a typical design for the 1720s. The train of the gown is folded up & the sides held back with a loop & button. This complicated draping required a reversal of the silk when sewn together, so that only the right side of the fabric would show when properly arranged. There are 2 very large, round, heavy lead weights in each sleeve. | V

Mantua

Blue silk brocade dress ca. 1775-1790.

Revolutionary War Period - Dress - BLUE SILK BROCADE DRESS, c. April 2009 Vintage Fashion and Textile Auction New York City Steel blue ground w/ meandering allover small floral pattern in French blue & ivory.

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