Explore The Olsen, Photo Credit and more!

Explore related topics

Coptic textile, Egyptian, ca. 4th Century A.D. Unknown fabric, 20.2 x 21.5 cm (7 15/16 x 8 7/16 in.). Gift of the Olsen Foundation. Photo credit: Yale University Art Gallery

Coptic textile, Egyptian, ca. Unknown fabric, x cm x 8 in. Gift of the Olsen Foundation.

Coptic Textile Fragment late 3rd–5th century Egypt Coptic Linen, wool; plain weave, tapestry weave, brocaded H. 11 1/4 in. (28.6 cm) W. 20 7/8 in. (53 cm) Textiles like this one are thought to have been produced by Copts (Christian Egyptians) and other weavers throughout the Byzantine Empire. The designs and motifs of Coptic and Byzantine textiles influenced the visual repertoire of the early Islamic period. This fragment was probably part of the shoulder decoration of a tunic

Coptic Textile Fragment Object Name: Fragment Date: late century Geography: Egypt Culture: Coptic Medium: Linen, wool; plain weave, tapestry weave, brocaded Dimensions: Textile: H. cm) Mount: H.

5th–6th century Egypt Wool, linen; plain weave, tapestry weave

Fragment of a Tunic Object Name: Fragment Date: century Geography: Egypt Culture: Coptic Medium: Wool, linen; plain weave, tapestry weave Dimensions: 10 in. high 3 in.

Sleeve Fragment with Plaid Cuff Object Name: Fragment Date: 4th–9th century Geography: Egypt Culture: Coptic Medium: Linen; plain weave Dimensions: 8 3/4 in. high 6 7/16 in. wide (22.3 cm high 16.4 cm wide) Classification: Textiles

Sleeve Fragment with Plaid Cuff Object Name: Fragment Date: century Geography: Egypt Culture: Coptic Medium: Linen; plain weave Dimensions: 8 in. high 6 in.

Tunic Date: 6th–7th century. Geography: Egypt, Akhmim (former Panopolis). Culture: Coptic. Medium: Linen, wool, and silk. Dimensions: 40.5 in. high 62.00 in. wide (102.9 cm high 157.5 cm wide). Classification: Textiles. Credit Line: Gift of George F. Baker, 1890. Accession Number: 90.5.901

Tunic Date: century Geography: Egypt, Akhmim (former Panopolis) Culture: Coptic Medium: Linen, wool, and silk

Linen Fragment with Ankh Cross, 4-5 century CE, Coptic Egyptian, Akhmim.  The original "Coptic cross" may have been influenced by the ankh symbol  and was adopted by early Christian Gnostics, most notably Valentinus of Alexandria, Egypt. For the Coptic Church, the circle represents the eternal and everlasting love of God, as shown through Christ's crucifixion, Christ's halo and resurrection.

Linen Fragment with Ankh Cross, century CE, Coptic Egyptian, Akhmim.

“Dalmatic of Charlemagne”.Eleventh century. Gift of the Patriarch of Constantinople, Isidore of Kiev (1439) to Pope Eugene IV (1431-1447) The only medieval liturgical vestment kept in the Treasury of St Peter’s is this dalmatic. It is a masterpiece of the art of embroidery practiced in Constantinople during the eleventh century. It is made entirely in embroidery with gold, silver and colored thread on blue silk with scenes from the Byzantine iconography of the ninth and tenth centuries.

The so-called “Dalmatic of Charlemagne”. Gift of the Patriarch of Constantinople, Isidore of Kiev to Pope Eugene IV The only medieval liturgical vestment kept in.

Tapestry with a centaur and Erotes, Coptic Egypt, 7th century BC

Tapestry with a Centaur and Erotes, Coptic Egypt, century BC

Pinterest
Search