Explore Dyeing Yarn, Dyeing Fabric, and more!

YELLOW - onion skins, goldenrod stems and flowers, sunflower petals, dock roots, marigold petals, moss, peach leaves, birch leaves, sagebrush

YELLOW - onion skins, goldenrod stems and flowers, sunflower petals, dock roots…

071514 blackberries ~ PURPLE - blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, rotten maple wood

still wish I could eat blackberries ~ PURPLE - blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, rotten maple wood

BLACK - wild grapes, hickory bark, alder bark, dogwood bark, mountain mahogany bark

BLACK - wild grapes, hickory bark, alder bark, dogwood bark, mountain mahogany bark

Plant materials make beautiful dyes. Materials are shredded, soaked in water and cooked down. Almost anything can be used for dyeing: Bark, berries, weeds, wildflowers, garden plants, mushrooms and lichens.

Plant materials make beautiful dyes. Materials are shredded, soaked in water and…

The Domestic Soundscape » Archive » Botaknits - I like the way the samples are displayed

Natural dyeing: colors organized by different shades, in a tester-strip card with a sample of each shade wrapped around it. By The Domestic Soundscape

How To Dye Yarn With Goldenrod Flowers

Before industrialization standardized and “chemicalized” the world of dyes, our agrarian ancestors practiced the art of dying yarn.

A Garden to Dye For: How to Use Plants from the Garden to Create Colors for Fabrics and Fibers

A Garden to Dye For: How to Use Plants from the Garden to Create Natural Colors for Fabrics & Fibers: Chris McLaughlin

Before Indigo was used, "woad" was used. "Woad is an old color. A conversation with history. A natural dye. An ugly plant. Locked in green leaves, compounds that break into pigments of blue." -Curious Blue | HandEye

Before Indigo was used, "woad" (Isatis tinctoria) was used. "Woad is an old color. A conversation with history. A natural dye. An ugly plant. Locked in green leaves, compounds that break into pigments of blue.

Extracting natural blue pigment from the leaves of the Woad plant. The pigment has traditionally been used to dye wool but it can also be used in naturally colouring soap.

Extracting natural blue pigment from the leaves of the Woad plant. The pigment has traditionally been used to dye wool but it can also be used in naturally colouring soap. ** Latin name = Isatis Tinctoria ** French name = pastel des teinturiers **

top seven colorfast natural dyes

Not So Fugitive Natural Dyes: Top Seven Colorfast Natural Dyes - Wearing Woad

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