Explore Dyeing Yarn, Dyeing Fabric, and more!

YELLOW - onion skins, goldenrod stems and flowers, sunflower petals, dock roots, marigold petals, moss, peach leaves, birch leaves, sagebrush

YELLOW - onion skins, goldenrod stems and flowers, sunflower petals, dock roots…

GREEN - moss, algae, lily-of-the-valley leaves, juniper berries

GREEN - moss, algae, lily-of-the-valley leaves, juniper berries

071514 blackberries ~ PURPLE - blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, rotten maple wood

still wish I could eat blackberries ~ PURPLE - blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, rotten maple wood

A Garden to Dye For: How to Use Plants from the Garden to Create Colors for Fabrics and Fibers

A Garden to Dye For: How to Use Plants from the Garden to Create Natural Colors for Fabrics & Fibers: Chris McLaughlin

Woad was grown and picked in its first year. Leaves were chopped up, made into balls and left to dry until they hardened. The dried balls were broken into a powder, sprinkled with water and allowed to ferment, known as couching. When the couched woad dried. Hot water is poured onto the couched woad in the vat, adding potash or urine. This mixture would ferment for days before the dyebath is ready.

dye with woad balls - teindre avec des "cocagne" de pastel

How to grow and dye with Woad (Isatis tinctoria)

how to grow woad and then process it into dye woad leaves harvested with secateurs

https://flic.kr/p/2VeHVs | Berries, Natural Dyes | At the carpet weaving center we visited on our trip to Cappadocia in Turkey this past July. All the wool dyes are made from natural sources of flowers, berries, leaves, and/or bark.

Berries, Natural Dyes by Philosopher Queen. This was my first job with CW between college years: we built a fire, boiled some berries or leaves and dyed some wool spun by CW's Spinning and Weaving Shop.

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