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Bashkir/Bashkort (Башҡорт теле / Başqort tele) is a member of the Kypchak-Bolgar group of the Turkic languages. It is spoken by about 1.5 million people mainly in the Republic of Bashkortostan, in other parts of the Russian Federation, including Chelyabinsk, Orenburg, Perm, Kurgan, Samara, Saratov, Sverdlovsk, Tyumen regions, and also in Tatarstan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan. (...)

Bashkir/Bashkort (Башҡорт теле / Başqort tele) is a member of the Kypchak-Bolgar group of the Turkic languages. It is spoken by about 1.5 million people mainly in the Republic of Bashkortostan, in other parts of the Russian Federation, including Chelyabinsk, Orenburg, Perm, Kurgan, Samara, Saratov, Sverdlovsk, Tyumen regions, and also in Tatarstan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan. (...)

Erzya (Эрзянь кель) is a Mordvinic language spoken by about half a milllion people in the Republic of Mordovia, and other parts of the Russia Federation. There are also Erzya speakers in Armenia, Estonia, Kazakhstan and other parts of Central Asia. Erzya and Moksha (мокшень кяль), a closely related though mutually unintelligible language, are collectively known as Mordvin. These languages have co-official status with Russian in the Republic of Mordovia. (...)

Details of Erzya, a Mordvinic language spoken mainly in the Mordvin Republic of the Russia Federation by about people.

Kazakh (Қазақ тілі / Qazaq tili / قازاق ٴتىلى) or Qazaq is a Turkic language spoken in Kazakhstan, Russia and China by about 11 million people. There are also Kazakh speakers in Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Russia and Iran. Kazakh was first written with the Arabic script during the 19th century when a number of poets, educated in Islamic schools, incited revolt against Russia. (...)

Kazakh is a Turkic language spoken in Kazakhstan, Russia and China by about 11 million people, and the alphabets used to write it.

Bukhori (бухорӣ / בּוּכאָריִ / بخاری) is a variety of Persian spoken by Bukharian Jews in Uzbekistan, Israel and the USA. The majority of speakers, about 50,000, are in Israel, and a similar number can be found in Uzbekistan, the USA and a number of other countries. (...)

Information about Bukhori, a Jewish language that evolved from classical Persian and is spoken in Uzbekistan, Israel and the USA by about people.

Xibe is a Tungusic language spoken in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in north west China by about 30,000 people. It is closely related to Manchu, though the Xibe people consider themselves a separte ethnic group. The Xibe were moved to the region in 1764 by the Ch'ing emperor Qianlong. The language is also known as Sibe, Xibo or Sibo. (...)

Xibe is a Tungusic language spoken in Xinjiang in north west China by about people. It is written the Xibe alphabet, a version of the Manchu alphabet.

Hittite (nešili) was spoken north-central Anatolia (part of modern Turkey) and is generally classified as belonging to the Anatolian branch of Indo-European languages. Written records of Hittite date from between the 16th and 13th centuries BC, and it is the earliest Indo-European to appear in writing. (...)

Hittite was an Anatolian language spoken in central parts of Anatolia (modern day Turkey) until about BC.

Udi (удин муз / udin muz) is a member of the Lezgian (southern) branch of the Northeast Caucasian languages. It is spoken by about 8,000 people in parts of Azerbaijan, Russia, Georgia and Armenia, with the majority of speakers in the Azerbaijani village of Nij in the Qabala district. There are also quite a few Udi speakers in villages in Tavush Province in northeastern Armenia. (...)

Details of Udi, a North East Caucasian language spoken in parts of Azerbaijan, Russia, Georgia and Armenia by about people.

The Brāhmī alphabet is the ancestor of most of the 40 or so modern Indian alphabets, and of a number of other alphabets, such as Khmer and Tibetan. It is thought to have been modelled on the Aramaic or Phoenician alphabets, and appeared in India sometime before 500 BC. Another theory is that Brāhmī developed from the Indus or Harappa script, which was used in the Indus valley until about 2,000 BC. (...)

The Brāhmī alphabet is the ancestor of many of the alphabets currently used in India and other parts of South and South East Asia

Shan is a Tai language spoken by about 3.3 million people in the Shan States of Burma in the northeast of the country, and also in parts of northern Thailand and in the Xishuangbanna (Sipsongpanna) Dai Autonomous Prefecture of Yunnan province in southwestern China. The language is also known as Tai-Yai, Tai-Long and ภาษาไทใหญ่. (...)

Shan is a Tai language spoken by about million people in parts of Burma, China and Thailand. The Shan script resembles the Burmese script but has a different structure.

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