Hurricane Mk IIC

Wartime colour photo of Hurricane flown by Sqn Ldr Denis Smallwood of 87 Sqn in overall ("Special Night") scheme and used on intruder operations

Hurricane Mk I LK-A flown by P/O William D "Dennis" David of No 87 Squadron RAF is refuelled at Seclin in May 1940. Prior to the German invasion in May 1940, the aircraft had a crowned red lion on a yellow crest painted onto its starboard cockpit door with eventually five small skulls added as David's victory markings above the artwork. A rigger unhinged the door soon after the aircraft had been abandoned at Merville and brought it back to England for eventual presentation to the squadron.

Hurricane Mk I LK-A flown by P/O William D "Dennis" David of No 87 Squadron RAF is refuelled at Seclin in May 1940. Prior to the German invasion in May 1940, the aircraft had a crowned red lion on a yellow crest painted onto its starboard cockpit door with eventually five small skulls added as David's victory markings above the artwork. A rigger unhinged the door soon after the aircraft had been abandoned at Merville and brought it back to England for eventual presentation to the squadron.

Hawker Hurricane Mk.Ia, 87 Squadron RAF, in the French airport, 1940

The RAF mainly used Supermarine Spitfire and Hawker Hurricane fighters. The group of pilots pictured are scrambling for their Hurricanes. (The Spitfire Story, by Graham Pitchfork, The History Press)

Hurricane Mk I fighters of No 87 Squadron RAF are lined up at Seclin in April 1940. Tests conducted during the 1930s convinced the RAF that the speed of modern aircraft would limit the amount of time for which a fighter pilot could hold a target in his sights. In 1937, the firepower was enough to outgun the early Me 109 variants. By 1940, it was recognised that the relatively small calibre armament was inadequate as Luftwaffe aircraft could survive numerous hits and still return safely to…

Hurricane Mk I fighters of No 87 Squadron RAF are lined up at Seclin in April 1940. Tests conducted during the 1930s convinced the RAF that the speed of modern aircraft would limit the amount of time for which a fighter pilot could hold a target in his sights. In 1937, the firepower was enough to outgun the early Me 109 variants. By 1940, it was recognised that the relatively small calibre armament was inadequate as Luftwaffe aircraft could survive numerous hits and still return safely to…

RAF FRANCE SEPT 1939 - MAY 1940 (HU 112449) Hawker Hurricane Mk Is of No. 87 Squadron at Lille-Seclin, France 1940.

HU Hawker Hurricane Mk I 'LK-H' of No. 87 Squadron nosed over after a landing accident at Lille-Seclin France

Sergeant B Bawden and Hurricane Mk IIC code LK-R HL865 Night Duty of No 87 Squadron at Charmy Down 2 September 1942

Sergeant B Bawden and Hurricane Mk IIC code LK-R Night Duty of No 87 Squadron at Charmy Down 2 September 1942

Many expected that the Germans would use gas at the outbreak of hostilities in September 1939. Constant training took place, with smoke bombs enveloping the fighters of No 87 Squadron RAF in their dispersal at Seclin used during a practice gas attack in early 1940.

Many expected that the Germans would use gas at the outbreak of hostilities in September Constant training took place, with smoke bombs enveloping the fighters of No 87 Squadron RAF in their dispersal at Seclin used during a practice gas attack in early


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