Paul Nash

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Paul Nash, Wittenham Clumps. A British surrealist painter and war artist, book-illustrator, writer and designer of applied art. He was the older brother of the artist John Nash. Wikipedia Born: May 11, 1889, London Died: July 11, 1946 Period: Surrealism

English music in an English landscape

Visiting Dorchester Abbey for the English Music Festival, and by chance, (for I had not known they were near) walking within sight of the Wittenham clumps, I was offered in one day a perfect fusion of early twentieth century English music and painting. Paul Nash was obsessed with these small rounded hills, and painted them numerous times - this, Under the Hill, in 1912. Wittenham Clumps was a landmark famous for miles around. An ancient British camp, it stood up with extraordinary prominence…

Nash, Paul (1889-1946) - 1918 Void Oil on canvas; 71.4 x 91.7 cm. Paul Nash, British painter, printmaker, illustrator, and photographer who achieved recognition for the war landscapes he painted during both world wars. Nash studied at the Slade School. Appointed an official war artist by the British government in 1917, he created scenes of war such as The Menin Road (1919), a shattered landscape painted in a semi-abstract, Cubist-influenced style.

Nash, Paul (1889-1946) - 1918 Void (National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa)

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Paul Nash, Landscape from a Dream 1936-8 Tate:

drawpaintprint

Paul Nash, Landscape from a Dream 1936-8 Tate: “ This painting marks the culmination of Nash’s personal response to Surrealism, of which he had been aware since the late 1920s. As the title suggests,...

Totes Meer (Dead Sea) 1940-1 Paul Nash

Toby's Room by Pat Barker – review

What role should art play in conflict? Hermione Lee acclaims Pat Barker's unflinching exploration