Manchester Museum Herbarium

Collection by Rachel Webster

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Juan Gatti Botany and Anatomy Entwined inspiration Anatomy Images, Anatomy Art, Anatomy Sketches, Book Projects, Visionary Art, Pulp Art, Heart Art, Botany, Traditional Art

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The hugely talented and successful Juan Gatti, grabbed Patternbank's attention with these staggering Anatomical/Botanical studies. The renowned graphic

Iceland moss (Cetraria islandica) is not actually a moss, but a species of lichen. The plant grows abundantly in mountainous regions of the Northern hemisphere. It is used in a number of food products and supplements. The extract can be used as a substitute for starch. The Curator of Botany brought us back lozenges made from the lichen when she returned from her trip to Iceland! Museum Collection, Weird And Wonderful, Medicinal Plants, Visual Communication, Scripts, Runes, Natural History, Botany, Curiosity

Iceland moss (Cetraria islandica) is not actually a moss, but a species of lichen. The plant grows abundantly in mountainous regions of the Northern hemisphere. It is used in a number of food products and supplements. The extract can be used as a substitute for starch. The Curator of Botany brought us back lozenges made from the lichen when she returned from her trip to Iceland!

Lemongrass oil is used as a pesticide and a preservative. Research shows that lemongrass oil has antifungal properties. Despite its ability to repel insects, its oil is commonly used as a "lure" to attract honey bees. Lemongrass works conveniently as well as the pheromone created by the honeybee's nasonov gland, also known as attractant pheromones. Because of this, lemongrass oil can be used as a lure when trapping swarms or attempting to draw the attention of hived bees. Herbal Tinctures, Herbalism, Bee Free, Lemongrass Oil, Honey Bees, Insect Repellent, Pharmacology, Bee Happy, Busy Bee

Lemongrass oil is used as a pesticide and a preservative. Research shows that lemongrass oil has antifungal properties. Despite its ability to repel insects, its oil is commonly used as a "lure" to attract honey bees. Lemongrass works conveniently as well as the pheromone created by the honeybee's nasonov gland, also known as attractant pheromones. Because of this, lemongrass oil can be used as a lure when trapping swarms or attempting to draw the attention of hived bees.

Bearberry is the main component in many traditional North American Native smoking mixes, known collectively as "kinnikinnick" (Algonquin for a mixture). Bearberry is used especially amongst western First Nations, often including other herbs and sometimes tobacco. Some historical reports indicate a "narcotic" or stimulant effect, but since it is almost always smoked with other herbs, including tobacco, it is not clear what psychotropic effects may be due to it alone. Shamanism, Medicinal Plants, Manchester, Smoking, Trees, Museum, Traditional, Fruit, American

Bearberry is the main component in many traditional North American Native smoking mixes, known collectively as "kinnikinnick" (Algonquin for a mixture). Bearberry is used especially amongst western First Nations, often including other herbs and sometimes tobacco. Some historical reports indicate a "narcotic" or stimulant effect, but since it is almost always smoked with other herbs, including tobacco, it is not clear what psychotropic effects may be due to it alone.

A Somali miswak fashioned out of a teeth-cleaning twig taken from the Salvadora persica tree. Somali, Teeth Cleaning, Medicinal Plants, Medical Advice, Natural History, Manchester, Paradise, Museum, Study

A Somali miswak fashioned out of a twig.The miswak or siwak is a teeth-cleaning twig taken from the Salvadora persica tree. A 2003 scientific study comparing the use of miswak with ordinary toothbrushes concluded that the results clearly were in favor of the users who had been using the miswak, provided they had been given proper instruction in how to brush using it. #ethnobotany

Jars of papaya milk or papain. Both green papaya fruit and the tree's latex are rich in papain, a protease used for tenderizing meat and other proteins. Its ability to break down tough meat fibers was used for thousands of years by indigenous Americans. It is now included as a component in powdered meat tenderizers. The Papaya fruit is also used to remedy digestive problems. Digestive Problems, Green Papaya, Medicinal Plants, Medical Advice, Manchester, Jars, Latex, Remedies, Pots

Jars of papaya milk or papain. Both green papaya fruit and the tree's latex are rich in papain, a protease used for tenderizing meat and other proteins. Its ability to break down tough meat fibers was used for thousands of years by indigenous Americans. It is now included as a component in powdered meat tenderizers. The Papaya fruit is also used to remedy digestive problems.

Pressed parrot tulip from the Leo Grindon Cultivated Plant Collection.

Pressed parrot tulip from the Leo Grindon Cultivated Plant Collection.

Lichen on a hawthorn tree - lichen identification and NHM survey event at Carsington with Derbyshire Wildlife Trust and Vivyan Lisewski-Hobson.

Lichen on a hawthorn tree - lichen identification and NHM survey event at Carsington with Derbyshire Wildlife Trust and Vivyan Lisewski-Hobson.

Six pressed ferns from South America which were used in the exhibition 'All Things Being Equal' wich ended this summer.

Six pressed ferns from South America which were used in the exhibition 'All Things Being Equal' wich ended this summer.

Catkin cluster in Museum allotment 20 Dec 2013

Catkins in the Museum allotment 20 Dec 2013

Collecting bits of trees for posterity round campus with Rachel and Josh

Collecting bits of trees for posterity round campus with Rachel and Josh

Lindsey and Josh repotting spider plants at the Firs experimental grounds. The plants will be sold at the Faculty of Life Sciences open day later in

Lindsey and Josh repotting spider plants at the Firs experimental grounds. The plants will be sold at the Faculty of Life Sciences open day later in 2014.

Sally and Sam looking after our bees

Sally and Sam looking after our bees

Blue passionflower pressed on a herbarium sheet years old.

Blue passionflower pressed on a herbarium sheet c.150 years old.

Sunset on the Quad Room

Sunset on the Quad Room

It’s the end of an era in the Manchester Museum Herbarium as we have a room cleared in preparation for a new storage system. The Quad Room (overlooking the Old Quadrangle and the John Owens b…