The RAF's first ace was New Zealander 'Cobber' Kain. He destroyed 17 enemy aircraft during the fighting in France before his tragic death in a flying accident.

Cobber Caine, Air Force Museum, New Zealand

Two Battle of Britain fighter pilots, Flight Lieutenant Brian Kingcome (left), commanding officer of No 92 Squadron RAF and , Flying Officer Geoffrey Wellum, next to a Spitfire at RAF Biggin Hill, Kent, 1941 - Photo by Cecil Beaton. [IWM]

holdhard: “ Two Battle of Britain fighter pilots, Flight Lieutenant Brian Kingcome (left), commanding officer of No 92 Squadron RAF and his wingman, Flying Officer Geoffrey Wellum, next to a Spitfire.

01 May 42: RAF fighter pilot George Beurling gets his first of 31 kills in a sweep over Calais. Beurling, a Canadian, will go on to become Canada's most famous hero of WWII, distinguishing himself in the defense of Malta. Nicknamed the "Falcon of Malta," he can best be described as having possessed superhuman abilities and a computer-like mind for mathematics. His record includes shooting down 27 enemy planes in 14 days and scoring one kill from a distance of 800 yards. #WWII #History

George "Buzz" Beurling (December the most successful Canadian fighter pilot of World War II, with 31 kills. He was a very interesting and eccentric person. He sadly died in a plane crash at the age of only

DOUGLAS BADER. TIN LEGS BATTLE OF BRITAIN HERO. ENDED UP IN COLDITZ. The British responded on 19 August 1941 with the "Leg Operation"—a RAF bomber was allowed to drop a new prosthetic leg by parachute to St Omer, a Luftwaffe base in occupied France, as part of Circus 81 involving six Bristol Blenheims and a sizeable fighter escort. The Germans were less impressed when, task done, the bombers proceeded on to their bombing mission to Gosnay Power Station near Bethune,

The death on this day August, 1962 of Douglas Bader.Bader lost both his…

Rare Named Spitfire Pilot Uniform Group.

Safety 1st Top-of-mattress Bed Rail, Cream

Named Spitfire Pilot Uniform Group.

Douglas Bader was determined to prove he could still fly and rejoin the R.A.F. after losing his legs

Douglas Bader, who lost his legs in a peace time flying accident, was determined to prove he could still fly and join the RAF after losing his legs

Battle of Britain pilots

Battle of Britain pilots

On 18 August 1940, P/O James E "Nigger" Marshall of No 85 Squadron RAF took off without orders when the rest of the squadron scrambled at 17.24 hours. Having returned to RAF Debden, S/L Peter W Townsend saw Hurricane Mk I VY-D land with one wingtip missing and was surprised to see Marshall climb out of the cockpit. Closing in on a He 111, he ran out of ammunition and rammed the bomber's tail unit with his starboard wing, losing the tip.

On 18 August 1940, P/O James E "Nigger" Marshall of No 85 Squadron RAF took off without orders when the rest of the squadron scrambled at 17.24 hours. Having returned to RAF Debden, S/L Peter W Townsend saw Hurricane Mk I VY-D land with one wingtip missing and was surprised to see Marshall climb out of the cockpit. Closing in on a He 111, he ran out of ammunition and rammed the bomber's tail unit with his starboard wing, losing the tip.

William Avery "Billy" Bishop: WWI Flying Ace Canada's highest-scoring fighter pilot of World War One, with 72 confirmed victories.

Billy Bishop was a Canadian flying ace during WWI. He shot down 72 German planes and received the Victoria Cross. His eyesight was phenomenal. He wanted to become a pilot because he was disgusted with the mud of the trenches. He passed away in September

Squadron Leader Edgar "Johnnie" Johnson, RAF, in the cockpit of has Supermarine Spitfire. Johnson was the highest scoring Allied fighter pilot of World War II. He flew 515 sorties and scored 34 airplanes destroyed, 7 shared destroyed, 3 probables and 10 damaged. All of his victories were against fighters.

Air Vice Marshal James "Johnnie" Johnson was a noted British fighter pilot during World War II. The Royal Air Force's top scorer against the Luftwaffe, Johnnie Johnson flew throughout the war. After World War II, Johnson saw service during the Korean War.

Canadian WWI pilot ace, Andrew Edward McKeever was born 21/8 1894.

Canadian WWI pilot ace, Andrew Edward McKeever was born

When P/O James E "Nigger" Marshall of No 85 Squadron RAF returned to RAF Debden on 18 August 1940, he was challenged by S/L Peter W Townsend for taking off without orders. Marshall admitted that he could not resist following in Hurricane Mk I VY-D, nor could he resist ramming a He 111 when out of ammunition, The enemy aircraft was assessed as probably destroyed and the sortie was subsequently legitimised by entering him as Yellow Two in the ORB.

When P/O James E "Nigger" Marshall of No 85 Squadron RAF returned to RAF Debden on 18 August 1940, he was challenged by S/L Peter W Townsend for taking off without orders. Marshall admitted that he could not resist following in Hurricane Mk I VY-D, nor could he resist ramming a He 111 when out of ammunition, The enemy aircraft was assessed as probably destroyed and the sortie was subsequently legitimised by entering him as Yellow Two in the ORB.

Royal Air Force flying ace, Lt. Raymond Collishaw in the cockpit of his Sopwith Camel fighter, nicknamed "Black Maria" in 1918. Collishaw ended World War I as the third highest ranked British ace with a total of 60 kills.

Raymond Collishaw in the cockpit of his Sopwith Triplane fighter, nicknamed "Black Maria" in Collishaw ended World War I as the third highest ranked British ace with a total of 60 kills.

Fighter ace: Douglas Bader's story is to be told in a Hollywood film dubbed ‘The First Great Escape’

Bader's great escape from the Nazis to be made into a movie

Fighter ace: Douglas Bader's story is to be told in a Hollywood film dubbed ‘The First Great Escape’

RAF 'Battle of Britain' Dispersal Hut

RAF 'Battle of Britain' Dispersal Hut British pilots wait for a call to action in a Dispersal Hut or Ready Room during the Battle of Britain

ROYAL AIR FORCE FIGHTER COMMAND, 1939-1945. | Imperial War Museums Squadron Leader Robert Stanford-Tuck, CO of No. 257 Squadron, in the cockpit of his Hawker Hurricane Mk I at Coltishall, January 1941.

Squadron Leader Robert Stanford-Tuck of No 257 Squadron, in the cockpit of his Hawker Hurricane Mark I at Coltishall, Norfolk, England - January 1941

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