Robert Stevens
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#Nietzsche nihilistic aphorism “God is Dead” is the starting point for his wider conviction that there were no truths or certainties  In this uncertain void, true meaning came in reaching for an inner #Ubermensch, where we should and must create our own values in a Will to Power.

Nietzsche nihilistic aphorism “God is Dead” is the starting point for his wider conviction that there were no truths or certainties In this uncertain void, true meaning came in reaching for an inner-Ubermensch, where we should and must create our own.

You must have chaos within you to give birth to a dancing star.  Nietzsche  #quote

Will always be an avocate of chaos theory ;) or that is my excuse for being a very chaotic person. But there is a map into my madness.

Socrates: "[...] injustice is never more profitable than justice." Glaucon: "The best is to do injustice without paying the penalty; the worst is to suffer it without being able to take revenge. Justice is a mean between these two extremes. People value it not because it is a good but because they are too weak to do injustice with impunity."

Booktopia has The Republic, Penguin Classics by Plato. Buy a discounted Paperback of The Republic online from Australia's leading online bookstore.

Learn by what amuses.

Do not train a child to learn by force or harshness; but direct them to it by what amuses their minds, so that you may be better able to discover with accuracy the peculiar bent of the genius of each.

#Camus was a French Existentialist, who was close both personally and philosophically with Sartre and De Beauvoir. Like them, he began with the simple claim that there were no objective laws and rules to life that could guide us. Humans had no ‘purpose’ (as Aristotle argued), there was no Moral Law (Kant), nor was there some afterlife to come. In his Myth of Sisyphus, Camus highlights what he sees as the Absurdity of existence. In the Myth, Sisyphus was destined to push a rock up a…

was a French Existentialist, who was close both personally and philosophically with Sartre and De Beauvoir. Like them, he began with the simple claim that there were no objective laws and rules to life that could guide us. Humans had no ‘purpose’ (