Juan Gris  José Victoriano (Carmelo Carlos) González-Pérez (March 23, 1887 – May 11, 1927), better known as Juan Gris (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈxwaŋ ˈgɾis]), was a Spanish painter and sculptor who lived and worked in France most of his life. His works, which are closely connected to the emergence of an innovative artistic genre—Cubism—are among the movement's most distinctive.

Juan Gris José Victoriano (Carmelo Carlos) González-Pérez (March 23, 1887 – May 11, 1927), better known as Juan Gris (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈxwaŋ ˈgɾis]), was a Spanish painter and sculptor who lived and worked in France most of his life. His works, which are closely connected to the emergence of an innovative artistic genre—Cubism—are among the movement's most distinctive.

Juan Gris was the Third Musketeer of Cubism, and actually pushed Cubism further to its logical conclusion until his ultimely death in 1927 at the age of 39. His pictures are a joy to look at!

Juan Gris was the Third Musketeer of Cubism, and actually pushed Cubism further to its logical conclusion until his ultimely death in 1927 at the age of 39. His pictures are a joy to look at!


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Today we wish a happy 130th birthday to Spanish artist Juan Gris. Gris is best known for his Cubist sculptures and paintings.  “Man in a Café,” 1912, by Juan Gris

Today we wish a happy 130th birthday to Spanish artist Juan Gris. Gris is best known for his Cubist sculptures and paintings. “Man in a Café,” 1912, by Juan Gris

Naturaleza muerta con botella y cuchillo. Juan Gris (1887-1927), Still Life with Bottles and Knife, 1912. MAURITSHUIS MUSEUM

Naturaleza muerta con botella y cuchillo. Juan Gris (1887-1927), Still Life with Bottles and Knife, 1912. MAURITSHUIS MUSEUM

Juan Gris, Breakfast, 1914 (cut and pasted papers, crayon, and oil on canvas, 31 7/8 x 23 1/2 inches; Museum of Modern Art, NYC). Clement Greenberg wrote that this collage succeeds better than Gris' more "decorative" collages, because it obviously depicts a still life: "with one's eyes focused primaraly on the flat surface pattern, one finds the picture disorganized and congested, but when one shifts focus and views it as a conventional picture, it springs instantly into perfection."

Juan Gris, Breakfast, 1914 (cut and pasted papers, crayon, and oil on canvas, 31 7/8 x 23 1/2 inches; Museum of Modern Art, NYC). Clement Greenberg wrote that this collage succeeds better than Gris' more "decorative" collages, because it obviously depicts a still life: "with one's eyes focused primaraly on the flat surface pattern, one finds the picture disorganized and congested, but when one shifts focus and views it as a conventional picture, it springs instantly into perfection."

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