Roxanne McGurk

Roxanne McGurk

Roxanne McGurk
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"He Fell Asleep As We Was Flyin’ Over Bristol.” (Harry Potter) by James Hance:

"He Fell Asleep As We Was Flyin’ Over Bristol.” (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) -James Hance

The Chicago police labeled her “more dangerous than a thousand rioters.” For almost 70 years, Lucy Parsons fought for the rights of the poor and disenfranchised in the face of an increasingly oppressive industrial economic system. Her radical activism challenged the racist and sexist sentiment in a time when it was assumed that women were biologically determined to stay at home barefoot and pregnant.

The Chicago police labeled her “more dangerous than a thousand rioters.” For almost 70 years, Lucy Parsons fought for the rights of the poor and disenfranchised in the face of an increasingly oppressive industrial economic system. Her radical activism cha

Always moving: Workers dig in Delancy Street on New York's Lower East Side in this photo dated July 29, 1908. The historical pictures released online for the first time show New York in the late 19th and early 20th centuries Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2134408/Never-seen-photos-100-years-ago-tell-vivid-story-gritty-New-York-City.html#ixzz1tL3H5a3T

n this July 1908 photo, workers dig in the street along the sidewalk on the north side of Delancey Street in New York. (AP / New York City Municipal Archives, Department of Bridges/Plant & Structures, Eugene de Salignac)

It's been half a century since three inmates pulled off a Houdini-like escape from America's most foreboding maximum security prison, Alcatraz, in San Francisco Bay. On the night of June 11, 1962, Frank Lee Morris and brothers Clarence and John Anglin climbed through spoon-dug tunnels to escape the 'The Rock', launching themselves into choppy seas on a raft made of rubber raincoats. The fugitives - all bank robbers - were never found despite one of the biggest-scale manhunts in history.

Prisoners of 'Ingenious' 1962 Alcatraz Escape Could Have Survived. Escaped Prisoners from Alcatraz Island

The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, Mar. 25, 1911 caused the deaths of 146 garment workers who died from the fire, smoke inhalation, or falling to their deaths. Most of the victims were recent Jewish and Italian immigrant women aged 16 to 23. The oldest was 48, the youngest were two 14 year-old girls. Because managers had locked the doors to the stairwells and exits – a common practice at the time, many who could not escape the the burning building jumped from the 8th, 9th, and 10th…

On March a quick-spreading fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory killed 146 people as thousands watched. The industrial accident had significant long-term effects in industrial safety reforms and union organizing.

An estimated 10,000 young Irish girls were sent to the laundries where they were were forced to work without pay and were subjected to a strict regime at the hands of the nuns who ran the institutions

Magdalene asylums, also known as the Magdalene laundries, were Irish 'institutions' from the to the late centuries ostensibly to house "fallen women", a term used to imply female sexual promiscuity or work in prostitution.

irish slavery | slave negros but us white irish were the first slaves of the colonies ...

Advertisement for the sale of indentured White servants, Virginia Gazette, 1774