Royal Society Publishing Photography Competition 2015

Winners and runners up highlight the importance of capturing nature to communicate science to everyone.
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Tadpoles overhead by Bert Willaert, Belgium. Winner of Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015. “To conserve the natural world I think drawing attention to the beauty of these ordinary moments in our own neighbourhoods, including our own backyards, is particularly important."

Category winner: Ecology and Environmental Science Tadpoles of many anuran species come in high numbers, but not many make it to adulthood. Here a group of common toad (Bufo bufo) tadpoles is seen from below.

Caribbean brain coral, by Evan D'Alessandro, USA. Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015.

A single colony of the giant Caribbean brain coral Colpophyllia natans hints at the virtuoso abilities of corals to assume a wide range of different forms and appearances.

Going with the flow: schooling to avoid a predator by Claudia Pogoreutz, Germany. Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015.

Going with the flow: schooling to avoid a predator. Clupeid fish exhibit synchronized behaviour to avoid a black-tip reef shark - Maldives

A baboon gets lost in his thoughts, by Davide Gaglio, South Africa. Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015.

A baboon gets lost in his thoughts by Davide Gaglio, South Africa. Special commendation This image was taken at Cape Point Reserve, South Africa. I was taking photos of a group of baboons trying to.

Pin droplets of water on the leaf of a fern by Ulrike Bauer, UK. Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015.

Fern with a drysuit (Credit: Ulrike Bauer) - The leaves of the water fern Salvinia molesta are covered with whisk-like hairs.

Dawn mating run of Canarian Houbarabustard, by Jose Juan Hernandez Martinez. Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015.

“An adult wild-bearded capuchin monkey (Sapajus libidinosus) uses a stone tool to crack a very resistant palm nut in Fazenda Boa Vista (Piauì, Brazil). These monkeys habitually crack open very resistant palm nuts on hard surfaces using stones as

Nut-cracking capuchin monkey, by Luca Antonio Marino, Italy. Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015.

Nut-cracking capuchin monkey, by Luca Antonio Marino, Italy. Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015.

Fish louse close-up, by Steve Gschmeissner, UK. Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015.

Steve Gschmeissner from the UK won a special commendation award for this false colored image of a fish louse captured through a scanning electron microscope:

Silverback gorillas contemplating the human society living alongside them, by Martha M. Robbins, Germany. Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015.

An underwater photo taken by biologist Bert Willaert has claimed first place in the Royal Society Publishing photography competition, showing a glimpse of life through the eyes of a tadpole.


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