Royal Society Publishing Photography Competition 2015

Winners and runners up highlight the importance of capturing nature to communicate science to everyone.
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Dawn mating run of Canarian Houbarabustard, by Jose Juan Hernandez Martinez. Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015.

An adult wild-bearded capuchin monkey (Sapajus libidinosus) uses a stone tool to crack a very resistant palm nut in Fazenda Boa Vista (Piauì Brazil). These monkeys habitually crack open very resistant palm nuts on hard surfaces using stones as

Nut-cracking capuchin monkey, by Luca Antonio Marino, Italy. Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015.

Nut-cracking capuchin monkey, by Luca Antonio Marino, Italy.

A baboon gets lost in his thoughts, by Davide Gaglio, South Africa. Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015.

A baboon gets lost in his thoughts 'I noted this baboon sitting and facing the sun with his eyes closed. Once I was close enough, and without distracting him, he put one hand under his face, posing as though he was lost in his thoughts.

Silverback gorillas contemplating the human society living alongside them, by Martha M. Robbins, Germany. Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015.

Silverback gorillas contemplating the human society living alongside them, by Martha M.

Going with the flow: schooling to avoid a predator by Claudia Pogoreutz, Germany. Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015.

Going with the flow: schooling to avoid a predator by Claudia Pogoreutz, Germany.

Tadpoles overhead by Bert Willaert, Belgium. Winner of Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015. “To conserve the natural world I think drawing attention to the beauty of these ordinary moments in our own neighbourhoods, including our own backyards, is particularly important."

Tadpoles overhead by Bert Willaert, Belgium. Winner of Royal Society Publishing photography competition 2015. “To conserve the natural world I think drawing attention to the beauty of these ordinary moments in our own neighbourhoods, including our own backyards, is particularly important."


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