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19th Century Cities

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c 1890 Arguments Yard Whitby North Yorkshire by Frank Meadow Sutcliffe. There are more yards to be seen in the book "Whitby yards through time" by Alan Whitworth.

Regent Street, London c 1885. Scan vintage photos with Pic Scanner app for iPhone and iPad www.picscannerapp.com

Regent Street, London c 1885 - I love this one - look at the symmetry of the buildings (and the clear road!

1866 medieval Steep Street from the junction with Trenchard Street | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

1866 medieval Steep Street from the junction with Trenchard Street (Bristol?) How the other half lived during Victorian times

‘Wych-Street’, from the London Illustrated News - January 1, 1870

‘Wych-Street’, from the London Illustrated News - January 1870 (Think about this when some people wnat to turn back the clock)

The Poor's Churchyard, Smithfield. c. 1877

Cloth Fair, next to Smithfield Market. You can see more pictures from the Society for Photographing Relics of Old London in The Ghosts of Old London and In Search of Relics of Old London.

Excelsior Hotel, Darlinghurst, 1883  Did 'old' buildings ever look new??

Excelsior Hotel, Great Barcom and West Sts, Darlinghurst 1883 x NationalLibraryAustralia.

The Art of the Photogravure | Annan, Thomas | Gallowgate, Glasgow

Gallowgate, Glasgow Annan, Thomas, The Golden Age of British Photography, 1868 Photogravure

Bridge House in George Row, Bermondsey – constructed over a creek at Jacob’s Island

[Wrong era, but great inspiration for Eva's book] The building with the canopy is Bridge House, George Row, Bermondsey, in Built around 1705 and demolished in the place was once surrounded by the Jacob's Island rookery.

The rear of St Bartholomew’s Church. Photo by Henry Dixon for the Society for Photographing Relics of Old London, after 1875

the-square-mile-of-london: At the back of St Bartholomew the Great, Cloth Fair, Smithfield, City of London,

the slums of London: their eradication also erased the last traces of the medieval city.

LONDON BEER FLOOD October 1814 (London beer companies competed to make the biggest beer vat, 8 people were killed when a giant vat burst in St. Giles Rookery, injured were taken to hospital almost caused a riot there.