high speed water drop photography by markus reugels (9) Through combinations of lighting, food colouring, surfaces and airstreams; Reugels creates incredible liquid art that is immortalized through his photography. Reguels stresses the fact that the images are not Photoshopped and that he only uses post-production software to remove things like sensor dust. All tones and colours are naturally processed and the shapes and patterns are not digitally manipulated.

German photographer Markus Reugels seeks to capture what he calls “magic moments” by using water, color and light. High-speed photography allows the artist to take a slice of movement. Mere fractions of a moment are immortalized in a single image.

Jack Long uses high-speed photography to capture the moment a splash is made in a cup of coffee. The Milwaukee-based photographer has taken a year to perfect his secret technique, but claims the effect is not created by dropping liquid as seen in other splash photography...

Pictures of the day: 14 December 2011

Bullet through the Apple, 1964 MIT professor Harold Edgerton invented the strobe flash in the 1930s and this is an example of his stroboscopic photography

Dr Strobe: the man who stopped time and electrified photography – in pictures

Dutch photographer Alexander Augusteijn uses high-speed photography to capture bullets piercing water.

High-Speed Photos of Bullets Piercing Water Look Almost Impossible

Dutch photographer Alexander Augusteijn uses high-speed photography to capture bullets piercing water.

High Speed Destruction    Photographer Alan Sailer spends an inordinate amount of time photographing objects meeting a violent demise by means of high speed projectiles, high voltage explosions, and sometimes just hurling things at a wall. There are thousands of photos in his Flickr stream.

High Speed Destruction Photographer Alan Sailer spends an inordinate amount…


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