Lost in movement. by Moeys Photography, by Moeys Photography.

In this image, the blur of people moving around in the crowd makes it look interesting, but it is also focusing on particular people who are standing, walking, moving in what looks like a busy area. A slow shutter speed is used in this image.

I love the shapes. The flowing fabrics and the strong lines of the dancers' bodies are a beautiful contrast, and all together they contort themselves into these organic shapes that are both graceful and powerful. Just begging for a sculpture!

The shapes. The flowing fabrics and the strong lines of the dancers' bodies are a beautiful contrast, and all together they contort themselves into these organic shapes that are both graceful and powerful. Just begging for a sculpture.

Using slow-motion photography would be interesting technique. It shows how much we actually don't see in our everyday lives, because it goes by too fast. - Emily

High Speed Photography is getting very popular day by day. High speed photography produces awesome results because of a relatively faster shutter speed.

#fire #photography

It seems to be on a whim, but Jared pulls out a lighter. He holds a Lunar Government flag in front of him. He strikes the lighter and a bright flame blossoms from it. He holds the flame to the flag. It crumbles to black dust in his hand.

Marcel Duchamp Descending a Staircase. His picture, Nude Descending a Staircase, is below. Made for Time by Eli's Elisofon.

Artist Marcel Duchamp walking down a flight of stairs in a multiple exposure image reminiscent of his famous painting “Nude Descending a Staircase.” Location: New York, NY, US Date taken: 1952 Photographer: Eliot Elisofon

Creative Multiple Exposure Photography by Stephanie Jung

Creative Multiple Exposure Photography by Stephanie Jung

Photographer Captures Vibrant Portraits Of Japan Using Multiple-Exposure. German photographer Stephanie Jung has captured various cities of Japan into be vibrant, dreamlike portraits.

A man rides a galloping horse as seen in this series of photographs depicting motion. These images, taken by Eadweard Muybridge, demonstrated a then-contentious theory that all four legs of a horse left the ground when at full gallop. From a limited edition of 295.

Photographer Eadweard Muybridge's Study of a Horse at Full Gallop in Collotype Print by Eadweard Muybridge

Clothed Descending a Staircase No. 2…  In an homage to Marcel Duchamp’s masterpiece Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 (itself inspired by Eadweard Muybridge’s photographs), Eliot Elisofon photographed Duchamp performing the act himself in 1952, and used multiple exposures to mimick the artist’s famous time-lapse-style painting.

Artist Marcel Duchamp walking down a flight of stairs in a multiple exposure image reminiscent of his famous painting “Nude Descending a Staircase.” Location: New York, NY, US Date taken: 1952 Photographer: Eliot Elisofon

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