~Vrishabha~   The word "vrishabha" means "bull," in this case the female counterpart of Nandi, as would be found in a Yogini Temple. In this relief, Vrishabha sits in Royal Ease, her lion vehicle beneath her feet. Her left arm cradles Ganesh. A Ganeshvari appears in the lower right corner, and possibly in the lower left corner (damaged) as well.  Satna is located about 75 mi (125 km) east of Khajuraho. 10th C.

~Vrishabha~ The word "vrishabha" means "bull," in this case the female counterpart of Nandi, as would be found in a Yogini Temple. In this relief, Vrishabha sits in Royal Ease, her lion vehicle beneath her feet. Her left arm cradles Ganesh. A Ganeshvari appears in the lower right corner, and possibly in the lower left corner (damaged) as well. Satna is located about 75 mi (125 km) east of Khajuraho. 10th C.

Pingala, attendant of Sûrya Gupta, East India 4th-5th century Terracotta Height: 40.7 cm

Pingala, attendant of Sûrya Gupta, East India century Terracotta Height…

Indian Temples and Iconography: Chaunsat yogini temple, Bheraghat Jabalpur-Ganeshani at Bheraghat

Strange temples that beat the canons of popular architecture echo the presence of an esoteric cult of the Mother Goddess in the form of "Cha.

Imagine posing as a model for this dancing female figure. You'll soon realize that this striking pose is anatomically impossible. Yet the sculptor has captured the essence of continuous, whirling motion

Dancing Celestial Deity (Devata) Date:early century Culture:India (Uttar Pradesh) Medium:Sandstone

A Tantric Goddess | LACMA Collections

A Tantric Goddess

A Tantric Goddess | LACMA Collections

A Tantric Goddess

In recent years, the Dallas Museum of Art has expanded its collection of South Asian art from a small number of Indian temple sculptures to nearly 500 works, including Indian Hindu and Buddhist sculptures, Himalayan Buddhist bronze sculptures and ritual objects, artwork from Southeast Asia, and decorative arts from India’s Mughal period. Artworks in the collection have origins from the former Ottoman empire to Java, and architectural pieces suggest the grandeur of buildings in the Indian…

The Arts of India, Southeast Asia, and the Himalayas at the Dallas Museum of Art

In recent years, the Dallas Museum of Art has expanded its collection of South Asian art from a small number of Indian temple sculptures to nearly 500 works, including Indian Hindu and Buddhist sculptures, Himalayan Buddhist bronze sculptures and ritual objects, artwork from Southeast Asia, and decorative arts from India’s Mughal period. Artworks in the collection have origins from the former Ottoman empire to Java, and architectural pieces suggest the grandeur of buildings in the Indian…


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