Pop Art

Collection by Steve's Stuff

10 
Pins

Examples of pop art

‘Pottery’, Patrick Caulfield, 1969 | Tate

‘Pottery’, Patrick Caulfield, 1969 | Tate

Artwork page for ‘Pottery’, Patrick Caulfield, 1969 The pottery objects in this painting have been depicted from different viewpoints depending on their situation in the overall composition. Thus those near the bottom of the image are painted as though seen from a point somewhere above, those near the centre appear to be viewed from eye level and those towards the top of the canvas are shown from below. This device emphasises the overall effect of the stacking up of a large number of similar…

Campbell's Soup Can | LACMA Collections

Campbell's Soup Can

Campbell's Soup Can, Andy Warhol (United States, Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, 1928-1987), United States, 1964, Paintings, Oil on canvas, Andy Warhol’s serial images, which have become synonymous with the Pop Art movement, question the role of commodities and advertising in American culture.

‘[no title]’, Andy Warhol, 1967 | Tate

‘[no title]’, Andy Warhol, 1967 | Tate

Artwork page for ‘[no title]’, Andy Warhol, 1967 In Marilyn Monroe, Warhol found a fusion of two of his consistent themes: death and the cult of celebrity. The star died tragically in August 1962. In the following two years, Warhol made thirty silkscreen paintings of her, always using the same publicity photograph from the 1953 film Niagara. This set of ten screenprints was produced in 1967, in an edition of 250. The repeated image serves as the basis for a series of startling colour…

‘Marilyn Diptych’, Andy Warhol, 1962 | Tate

‘Marilyn Diptych’, Andy Warhol, 1962 | Tate

Artwork page for ‘Marilyn Diptych’, Andy Warhol, 1962 Warhol made his first paintings of Marilyn Monroe soon after the actor died of a drug overdose on 5 August 1962. Warhol used a publicity photo for her 1953 film Niagara as the source image. The use of two contrasting canvases for Marilyn Diptych illustrates the contrast between the public life of the star, who at the time was one of the most famous women alive, and her private self. This was not necessarily Warhol’s intention. He created…

‘After Lunch’, Patrick Caulfield, 1975 | Tate

‘After Lunch’, Patrick Caulfield, 1975 | Tate

Artwork page for ‘After Lunch’, Patrick Caulfield, 1975 on display at Tate Liverpool. Patrick Caulfield’s paintings explore alternative ways of picturing the world. After Lunch was one of his earliest works to combine different styles of representation. In this case, what appears to be a photomural of the Château de Chillon hanging in a restaurant is depicted with high-focus realism, contrasting with the cartoon-like black-outlined imagery and fields of saturated colour of its surroundings…

Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Whaam!’ 1963

Roy Lichtenstein 1923–1997 | Tate

Artist page for Roy Lichtenstein (1923–1997)

‘Black Bean’, Andy Warhol, 1968 | Tate

‘Black Bean’, Andy Warhol, 1968 | Tate

Artwork page for ‘Black Bean’, Andy Warhol, 1968 Warhol painted familiar consumer items such as coca-cola bottles or soup cans throughout the 1960s, the earliest examples first shown in New York in 1962. Asked why he painted soup cans, Warhol replied, 'Because I used to drink it. I used to have the same lunch every day.' Using screenprinting, Warhol could simulate the mechanical effect of his source to the extent that the resulting image appears almost untransformed. Yet, the rich colour…