William (Billy) Hill, a notorious London gangster who was suspected of orchestrating a daring robbery on a Post Office mail van in 1952 which netted the criminals responsible £ 236,748 10s. Read the full story at http://postalheritage.wordpress.com/2012/05/21/the-great-unsolved-crime/

The great unsolved crime

William (Billy) Hill, a notorious London gangster who was suspected of orchestrating a daring robbery on a Post Office mail van in 1952 which netted the criminals responsible £ 236,748 10s. Read the full story at http://postalheritage.wordpress.com/2012/05/21/the-great-unsolved-crime/

Wanted poster of the Great Train Robbery robbers and their associates. This was produced not long after the robbery and was widely distributed. (POST 120/95)

Wanted poster of the Great Train Robbery robbers and their associates. This was produced not long after the robbery and was widely distributed. (POST 120/95)

The train carriage following the Great Train Robbery. © Thames Valley Police.

The Great Train Robbery, the aftermath and the Investigations: A Story from the Archive

The train carriage following the Great Train Robbery. © Thames Valley Police.

Image of signal box, with glove added by the Great Train Robbery robbers. ©Thames Valley Police Museum.

Image of signal box, with glove added by the Great Train Robbery robbers. ©Thames Valley Police Museum.

Inside the carriage after the Great Train Robbery. © Thames Valley Police

Great Train Robbery podcast

Inside the carriage after the Great Train Robbery. © Thames Valley Police

Ronnie Biggs mugshot. (POST 120/100, pg1-2)

The Great Train Robbery, the aftermath and the Investigations: A Story from the Archive

Ronnie Biggs mugshot. (POST 120/100, pg1-2)

Postal order for 15/6 purchased by George Archer-Shee (aka The Winslow Boy).

The real Winslow Boy

Postal order for 15/6 purchased by George Archer-Shee (aka The Winslow Boy).


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Aug 8, 1963 Britain's "Great Train Robbery" took place as thieves made off with 2.6 million pounds in banknotes from a train they stopped north of London.

How the Great Train Robbery Worked

Aug 8, 1963 Britain's "Great Train Robbery" took place as thieves made off with 2.6 million pounds in banknotes from a train they stopped north of London.

The Glasgow-London Royal mail train attacked by Ronnie and his gang.

Great Train Robbery: Ronnie Biggs speaks out on 50th anniversary saying he was 'proud' of the heist

The Glasgow-London Royal mail train attacked by Ronnie and his gang.

Leatherslade Farm at Oakley Buckinghamshire, where the Great Train Robbers hid

The Great Train Robbery: How it happened

Leatherslade Farm at Oakley Buckinghamshire, where the Great Train Robbers hid

The Big Mystery Behind the Great Train Robbery May Finally Have Been Solved | History | Smithsonian

The Big Mystery Behind the Great Train Robbery May Finally Have Been Solved

The Big Mystery Behind the Great Train Robbery May Finally Have Been Solved | History | Smithsonian

August 1963: Police stand guard outside Leatherslade Farm at Oakley in Buckinghamshire, used as a hide-out by the Great Train Robbers

The Great Train Robbery: How it happened

August 1963: Police stand guard outside Leatherslade Farm at Oakley in Buckinghamshire, used as a hide-out by the Great Train Robbers

Vehicle: A truck used by the Great Train Robbers to transfer their £2.6million of stolen money taken from the Royal Mail train.

Great Train Robbery detective's unseen pictures of the famous heist

Vehicle: A truck used by the Great Train Robbers to transfer their £2.6million of stolen money taken from the Royal Mail train.

Guilty - The Great Train Robbery

Guilty - The Great Train Robbery

Thames Valley police handout photo of part of the 2.5 million stolen by the Great Train Robbers forty years ago, that went on display today at an exhibition at Thames Valley Police's museum in Sulhamstead, near Reading.

The Great Train Robbery - in pictures

Thames Valley police handout photo of part of the 2.5 million stolen by the Great Train Robbers forty years ago, that went on display today at an exhibition at Thames Valley Police's museum in Sulhamstead, near Reading.

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