Dazzle

Collection by Martin Van Breems

11 
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'Glenroy' in Camouflage

'Glenroy' in Camouflage

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041 Dazzle Camouflage, Ship in Dry Dock by Vorticist artist Edward Wadsworth ▫ 1918

Dazzle Ships and the art of confusion

A striking new design on an old boat gives a fascinating glimpse of the history of warfare.

“Dazzle” warship USS Mahomet in port, circa November 1918.

An Unofficial Visual History of Camouflage

MARPAT US Woodland camo pattern It’s uncanny, the similarities between birthing babies and books. No sooner do you pop out the first one, folks start eagerly chatting you up about #2. While the jury remains out on sibling-making for our son, I’m at least equipped with an answer for what I’ll tackle for book #2: a po...

US Navy freighter USS Federal with dazzle camouflage, photograph likely taken on 16 Nov 1918

[Photo] US Navy freighter USS Federal with dazzle camouflage, photograph likely taken on 16 Nov 1918

[Photo] US Navy freighter USS Federal with dazzle camouflage, photograph likely taken on 16 Nov 1918 | World War II Database

Prepare to be dazzled! A history of nautical camouflage - in pictures

Prepare to be dazzled! A history of nautical camouflage - in pictures

Dazzle painting was created during the first world war to protect British naval vessels from German attack. The jagged, almost psychedelic designs influenced artists including Peter Blake, Carlos Cruz-Diez and Tobias Rehberger

Painting a ship in dazzle camouflage. // famous painting "Dazzle-ships in Drydock at Liverpool" by Edward Wadsworth who designed dazzle camo in WWI

Art of the First World War

Max Oppenheimer, Bleeding Man, 1911 " It is the first death which infects everyone with the feeling of being threatened. It is impo...

Plate from 1922 showing the dazzle camouflage method, illustrated by Norman Wilkinson (via Encyclopædia Britannica)

Modernist Camouflage, Reconstructed

The general goal of camouflage is to be invisible. Back during World War I, however, hundreds of Allied ships went to battle painted in bright geometric designs that were anything but subtle.

The Passion of Former Days: Dazzle Paint

Dazzle Paint

In World War One, ships were frequently dazzle-painted-- painted all over with crazy lines and stripes, which served to confuse their locations and outlines to enemy submarines and ships in the days before radar. These were not only black and white, as they appear in these photos-- shades of blue and acquamarine alternated with grey and black (as in this terrific painting by Group of Seven painter Arthur Lismer). Even at the time observers noted how harbours ended up looking like a floating…